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In this Jan. 18, 2016, file photo, a female Aedes aegypti mosquito is pictured on the arm of a researcher at the University of Sao Paulo.

Andre Penner/AP

A Quebec City-based research team has received the green light to begin testing a Zika vaccine on humans.

The Universite Laval-based group says it is the first in Canada to be authorized by Health Canada and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to begin clinical studies.

The researchers will work in conjunction with two research centres in the United States to develop a vaccine for the mosquito-borne virus.

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They are looking for healthy adult volunteers to take part in the study.

Although most cases of Zika are fairly mild, the virus has been linked to miscarriages and birth defects in babies born to women who have been infected.

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