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People attend a vigil for victims of a shooting at a mosque in Quebec City on Sunday, at the Grand Parade in Halifax.

Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press

TODAY'S TOP STORIES

The six victims in the Quebec City mosque attack

They left the countries they were born in to seek a better life in Canada. On Sunday night, these six men were killed in the mosque attack:

Abdelkrim Hassane, 41, a father of two young children, worked as an analyst-programmer for the Quebec government.

Ibrahima Barry, 39, worked for the province's health-insurance board. He had five children.

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Mamadou Tanou Barry, 42, a civil servant working in IT, had two boys, aged two and four.

Azzedine Soufiane, 57, a father of three and owner of a halal grocery shop, was known for helping out newly arrived Muslims.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau joined hundreds of others at a vigil for those killed in Sunday's shooting at a Quebec City mosque.

Khaled Belkacemi, 60, was an agri-food engineering professor at Laval University.

Boubaker Thabti, 44, worked at a pharmacy and had two young children.

Suspect charged

The lone suspect in the Quebec City mosque attack has been charged with six counts of murder and five counts of attempted murder. Laval University student Alexandre Bissonnette, 27, was known in the city's activist circles as an online troll who was inspired by extreme right-wing French nationalists. "I didn't even think of him as totally racist, but he was enthralled by a borderline racist nationalist movement," a fellow Laval student who grew up with Bissonnette said, referring to the hardline anti-immigration sentiment growing in popularity in Europe and elsewhere. Besides traffic tickets, Bissonnette didn't have any run-ins with police, court records show.

Reaction to the attack

Thousands turned out for a vigil in Quebec City on Monday night, including Justin Trudeau. Earlier in the day, the Prime Minister called the mass shooting a "terrorist attack." Meanwhile, teachers at schools across Canada are navigating how to talk to students about the mosque attack, as well as about Donald Trump's immigration order. "Our message is peace and love," said a Montreal school principal. "It's sappy to say, but it boils down to that."

Trump not backing down on executive order

The opposition to Trump's executive order on immigration is growing, but he's not backing down from the decision. Hours after acting attorney-general Sally Yates told federal prosecutors not to defend Trump's ban, he fired her. Among those who condemned the entry ban on Monday: Barack Obama, the CEOs of Goldman Sachs and Ford, and a representative for the conservative billionaire Koch brothers. Democrats are hoping to introduce measures to roll back the order, but the majority of Republicans in Congress support Trump's plan. Ottawa says Canadian dual citizens and permanent residents from the seven affected countries can enter the U.S., but Trudeau and company aren't saying whether the White House has provided written assurances.

Trump prompts changes to B.C.'s foreign-buyers tax

Trump's actions prompted B.C. Premier Christy Clark to announce changes to the province's foreign-buyers tax. The 15-per-cent tax will no longer apply to those working and paying taxes in B.C., a measure that the business community had been calling for since August. Clark is hoping to attract skilled professionals now shut out of the U.S.

MORNING MARKETS

The U.S. dollar headed for its worst start to a year since 2008 on Tuesday while world stock losses grew after widespread protests against President Donald Trump's stringent curbs on travel to the U.S. Tokyo's Nikkei lost 1.7 per cent, while many other Asian markets were closed. In Europe, London's FTSE 100, Germany's DAX and the Paris CAC 40 were up by between 0.1 and 0.5 per cent by about 5:40 a.m. ET. New York futures were down. Oil prices dipped as rising U.S. drilling activity offset efforts by OPEC and other producers to cut output in a move to prop up the market.

THE LOOKAHEAD

Toronto home prices will go up again this year, the city's real estate board predicts. Average resale prices are expected to jump to $825,000 after hitting $729,922 in 2016.

WHAT EVERYONE'S TALKING ABOUT

An attack on Canadian Muslims is an attack on Canada

"It's worth remembering that Canada has no official religion, race or culture. That is what unites us. Every Canadian, regardless of faith or ethnic origin, is as Canadian as every other. An attack on any Canadian, simply for exercising their constitutional right to live according to the dictates of their conscience, or because they trace their ancestry to one part of the world and not another, is an attack on all Canadians." – Globe editorial

What the mosque means to me

"I never imagined a day would come when I would look at my mosque and wonder if it was safe to go inside. I need my mosque to go back to what it was before the Quebec shootings, a place where my community and I organize, cajole and negotiate with one another despite the differences of our skin colours, religious outlooks and heat tolerance. … I will not be afraid. I believe in the goodness of my neighbours, my community and my country – a country that never fails to make me proud. A country that has welcomed the poor and desperate from all over the world. A country that stands up to the calls of xenophobia, which grow louder every day." – Zarqa Nawaz, creator of Little Mosque on the Prairie

HEALTH PRIMER

Four things to know about sleep and your health

Sleeping too long can be bad for you: Everyone is different, but tracking your patterns with a diary could help determine how many hours you need. Sleep isn't gender-neutral: For one, women are more likely to have insomnia. Snoring is nothing to laugh at: It's the main symptom of sleep apnea, and good breathing is key to a good night's rest. Sleep and learning disorders: A sleep study may be a good idea if you have a child with ADHD or mental-health issues.

MOMENT IN TIME

Leonard Cohen performs Hallelujah

Jan. 31, 1985: Leonard Cohen's Hallelujah had a famously uncertain pathway to fame. He struggled for years to write it, at one point smashing his head on the floor of a hotel room trying to finish it. Cohen was said to have written 80-plus verses. After presenting its accompanying album, Various Positions, to his record company in the mid-1980s, they declined to release it, forcing Cohen to put it out independently. Its reception was lukewarm. Then The Velvet Underground's John Cale covered Hallelujah for a compilation record in 1991. When a young songwriter named Jeff Buckley heard Cale's version, he released his own in 1994 – then died tragically three years later, propelling the song to classic status. Cohen's first live performance of Hallelujah has its own uncertainties, hindered by archival setlists' availability. The most widely circulated date? Jan. 31, 1985, at the start of the Various Positions tour, in Mannheim, Germany. – Josh O'Kane

Morning Update is written by Arik Ligeti.

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