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College de Maisonneuve is shown in Montreal, Sunday, March 13, 2016, following a news conference where the Quebec government has announced funding to help prevent radicalization at the CEGEP.

Graham Hughes/THE CANADIAN PRESS

The Quebec government is offering a $400,000 grant to boost resources at a Montreal junior college that has been the subject of media reports concerning radicalization.

Higher Education Minister Hélène David says the amount will be used in part to hire additional personnel at Collège de Maisonneuve as part of a pilot project to enhance harmonious living.

A statement says the project's goal is to help the school's communities live together.

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Early last year, several of the college's students were among the group of young Montrealers arrested on suspicion of wanting to join jihadi groups overseas.

Two of them faced charges, including attempting to leave Canada to commit a terrorist act abroad.

El Mahdi Jamali and Sabrine Djermane, both then 18, pleaded not guilty to four charges last April.

School director Malika Habel said Sunday morning she asked the government for help after recent incidents at the school that are part of a fallout from last year's tensions.

The school's administration has confirmed police were called to the school in early December after a fight broke out among a group of students.

It has also said the behaviour of certain students has led to a "climate of tension" with staff, but denies local media reports that indicated the incidents are tied to radicalization.

Ms. Habel says the school has been taking steps to address the issue of radicalization and that no other students have tried to leave for Syria.

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Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre describes the pilot project as an important tool to promote openness.

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