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Headstones in in a section dedicated to Canadian war veterans at Mountain View and St. Patrick's Cemeteries in Thunder Bay, Ont. on Nov. 11, 2014.Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

A solemn ceremony at Ottawa's National War Memorial, where a Canadian soldier was shot dead only weeks ago, was the focus of Canada's day of reflection for those killed in war.

The Oct. 22 death of Corporal Nathan Cirillo, and the killing of Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent in Quebec two days earlier, brought renewed attention on this year's Remembrance Day ceremonies, which mark 100 years since hostilities were declared in the First World War.

Read the full text of Governor-General David Johnston's Remembrance Day speech in Ottawa.

SLAIN SOLDIERS: DOES THIS YEAR MATTER MORE?

A large crowd turned out to Tuesday's event in Ottawa, where security has been ramped up since the attacks on two soldiers on Canadian soil.

  • Opinion: Cpl. Cirillo’s death has brought special significance to Remembrance Day by shifting focus from long-ago battles in distant countries to a tragedy at home, journalist Richard Foot argues
  • Your say: Is this Remembrance Day more significant for you? Vote in our poll

THE FALLEN: STORIES OF CANADA'S WAR DEAD

Close to 61,000 Canadians died in the First World War, and 45,000 in the second. Here are the stories of a few of the men and women who returned home.

THE MEMORIALS: WHY THE MONUMENTS MATTER

When Ottawa's National War Memorial was unveiled in 1939, King George VI proclaimed it "the spontaneous response of the nation's conscience. The very soul of the nation is here revealed." But Ottawa's is one of many monuments to Canada's war dead.

THE SYMBOLS: POPPIES AND POETRY

Inspired on the battlefields of Ypres, Canadian John McCrae created one of Remembrance Day's enduring symbols, the poem In Flanders Fields, which turns 100 next year.

SHOULD REMEMBRANCE DAY BE A HOLIDAY?

Bill C-597, introduced by NDP MP Dan Harris, proposes to make Nov. 11 a national statutory holiday. It passed second reading in the House of Commons on Nov. 5.

PAST AND FUTURE: CANADA'S ROLE IN GLOBAL CONFLICT

The war memorial in Ottawa was rededicated on Tuesday to honour all who have fallen in the service of Canada, including the Afghan mission and the Boer War. Shifting the focus from long-ago conflicts to more recent ones has stirred debate over Canada's role in global conflicts and how best to honour soldiers in the future.

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