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Late-night partiers looking for a better way to get home than on the TTC's infamous "vomit comet" all-night buses will be disappointed with a recent report on extending subway hours.

Last summer, before he was elected mayor, TTC commissioner David Miller asked TTC staff to study the feasibility of running subway trains past their present stop times -- largely clustered around 1:30 a.m. -- on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights.

The report, to be presented to the Toronto Transit Commission tomorrow, concludes that numbers of riders are too low to warrant the cost of keeping the trains running.

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Currently, club-goers and night owls rely on the TTC's blue night bus lines, which replace the subway system when it shuts down for the night. On weekends, the all-night buses along Bloor Street or up Yonge Street often carry bleary-eyed revellers.

For the feasibility study, the TTC counted riders on the last train of the night leaving two of what it said were its busiest late-night stations, recording numbers for both midweek and on a Saturday night.

On a weeknight on the Bloor-Danforth line at St. George Station, near the University of Toronto's downtown campus, there were just 11 people on the last eastbound train and 28 on the last westbound train, the report said.

On Saturday, there were 46 westbound passengers on the last westbound train and 12 on the last eastbound one.

On the Yonge-University-Spadina line, at Wellesley Station, only eight people caught the last northbound train midweek, and 11 were southbound. On a Saturday, 29 headed north; 38 headed south.

The TTC report concludes that even the late-night Saturday riders could be easily carried on a bus.

"It is unlikely that many new passengers would be attracted to the system if subway service were extended later than the current hours of operation," the report says.

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It concludes that the costs of leaving the trains up and running wouldn't make economic sense.

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