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Canada Slain woman had been big on security, mother testifies

Lisa Posluns was an immaculately dressed, security-conscious businesswoman whose last serious relationship ended seven years before she was found slain in the equipment room of her Yorkville office building, court was told yesterday.

Nelson DeJesus, 36, a former cleaner at 94 Cumberland St., where Ms. Posluns had a fifth-floor office, stands accused of first-degree murder in her death. In its opening remarks Tuesday, the Crown said it will show that Mr. DeJesus left his DNA at the scene of the killing and was carrying a knife sheath and handcuffs at the time of his arrest, both of which had traces of her blood.

It is inconceivable that she was in a relationship with a cleaner, Ms. Posluns's mother, Margie Posluns, told a jury yesterday, but in the last year of her life someone had been bothering her.

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The jury also heard testimony from Ms. Posluns's sister, Helen, and from two employees of the Holt Renfrew department store where Ms. Posluns was seen on the day she died, Saturday, Nov. 2, 2002.

Helen Posluns said she and her sister were very close. They often talked about their relationships and she knew that Lisa, 38 when she died, hoped to get married and have children. She sometimes went on dates arranged by friends, but hadn't been in a steady relationship since 1995. There would have been no explanation for the saliva found on her underpants or the semen found on her jeans, court was told.

On that Saturday, Ms. Posluns got her hair washed at Holt Renfrew. She returned to her office, and spoke to her mother that night at 7:49. Her mother said she hated her daughter's office building. "There was no security there. [Lisa]was always sensitive to her own security."

The court heard that Ms. Posluns had alarm systems with motion detectors installed in her home and office.

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