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Aircraft Technicians from Air Task Force-Iraq (ATF-I) perform maintenance and servicing of CF-18 Hornets between missions in Kuwait, during Operation Impact 22 November, 2014.

Canadian Forces Combat Camera

Quebeckers worries over religious radicalism may be creating a welcome political environment for Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

A poll by Léger this month found strong support in Quebec for the Conservatives' anti-terror legislation and Canada's mission against Islamic State militants in Iraq. Three-quarters of respondents expressed concern over terrorism and religious fundamentalism and roughly the same percentage backed federal legislation giving Canadian security services and police more powers.

The staunch support marks a shift in attitudes in a province that has traditionally resisted military intervention and the Conservatives' law-and-order agenda. Quebeckers strongly opposed Canada's military role in Afghanistan.

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"It's astonishing to see Quebeckers tending to be supportive now," said Christian Bourque, executive vice-president of Léger.

He said the recent terror attacks in Ottawa and St. Jean-sur-Richelieu, both involving lone-wolf radicals who grew up in Quebec, had an impact on Quebec public opinion. "It changed something in the mindset: It was great to be a pacifist before, because it wasn't us. But now it is us."

While Quebeckers tended to stand apart from the rest of Canadians when it came to military intervention, the shift within Quebec has created a nationwide consensus. "This is the first time that clearly Quebeckers are on the same page as other Canadians," Mr. Bourque said.

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