Skip to main content

A different look at the news

  • The meltdown of Donald Trump
  • Some locker room scenes I'd love to see
  • Talkin' Donald Trump Blues
  • What to watch and read this weekend
  • What to watch for (and ponder) in the coming days

The past week

The meltdown of Donald Trump

“Go ahead, kick his butt.”

Photo illustration

As my colleague Affan Chowdhry puts it, Donald Trump is now the proverbial bull in the china shop: He’s unstoppable and really angry.

The last week has been a transformational one for the Trump campaign. As in, transformed into clear loser.

From the “locker room” to the debate to the new allegations, which Mr. Trump denies, the die appears cast. Here’s what Affan says:

“The Republican Party is in a delicate state and virtually in a full-blown panic over its November fortunes. The White House has pretty much slipped away and now it’s a question of holding on to their seats (and majorities) in Congress. Somewhere at a private Democratic fundraiser, Hillary Clinton is doing that smiley-face jig she showcased in the first presidential debate.

“It is hard to overstate just how monumental the last week has been in U.S. politics. Every day brings cringe-worthy allegations against the Republican presidential nominee. Whatever happens to American democracy, one day this chapter will be taught in Politics 101, leaving students shaking their heads and wondering: How the heck did that actually happen?’”

Let’s go back a week when it all started to slip away with revelations of what Mr. Trump dismissed as “locker room” fun.

That, writes my friend Zosia Bielski, was a transformational moment in more ways that one:

“When the 2005 recording of Trump bragging about groping the genitals of unsuspecting women was unleashed this past weekend, and when Trump defended it as mere ‘locker room banter,’ many men had heard enough. Men who may have have stood silently by before have now rallied. Guys of all stripes stood up and said not in our name: This is not how all men talk about or conceive of women in private.”

And here are some scenes I’d love to see:

“C’mon, Mike, I’ll introduce you to the guys.”

Photo illustrations

The impact

We’ve spent a lot of time on the potential economic impact of a Trump presidency. Now that that’s looking less and less likely, let’s look at what Hillary Clinton could mean.

“Historically, unified government (same party in the White House, Senate and House) has been less than common, occurring in just over one-third of years since 1951,” said BMO Nesbitt Burns senior economist Robert Kavcic, looking at the impact of a sweep by the Democrats.

Occurence of a unified government (same party in the White House, Senate and House) in the U.S.

Legend: Democrat Republican Unified government
Year President Senate House
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
MURAT YUKSELIR / THE GLOBE AND MAIL > Source: BMO NESBITT BURNS

“Current Democratic policy leanings aside for now, equity markets have historically prospered under unified governments,” Mr. Kavcic said.

“Average annual returns have run at 10.6 per cent since 1951, versus 7.6 per cent under divided government. Also, more than 79 per cent of years have been positive versus less than 71 per cent under divided government.”

By way of caveat, Mr. Kavcic noted that unified governments haven’t had to struggle with a recession, but for 1980.


Your weekend

There’s a lot to watch and read this weekend, including a bunch of new movies and a couple of books on the man who haunts us still.

You know how people joke about accountants? My colleague Brad Wheeler certainly doesn’t in his review of The Accountant, starring Ben Affleck and Anna Kendrick, which he calls a pulpy, peculiar and half-camp thriller whose victory lies in its tone.

My friend Barry Hertz, meanwhile, gives a big thumbs-up to American Honey, starring Sasha Lane and Shia LaBeouf, which he deems a gritty, captivating look at a lost generation. Notably, it will make you feel dirty.

Barry’s not so keen on Complete Unknown, with Rachel Weisz and Kathy Bates. It’s just a bad movie with good actors.

If you’re staying home to read, see what my colleague Eric Andrew-Gee says about two new books on Pierre Trudeau, an extraordinary man in an extraordinary era.

And which wine goes best for the season? Beppi Crosarial looks at 10 bold reds of autumn.


The week ahead

Canada’s health ministers meet in Toronto on Monday and Tuesday, and the first order of business depends on whom you ask. Here’s what my colleague Kelly Grant says:

“The provincial and territorial health honchos are determined to talk money. For months now, they’ve been urging the Trudeau government to strike a new deal on health-care funding, one that would be more generous than the old Harper government’s plan to reduce the growth in health transfers. Since 2004, the whack of cash that Ottawa sends the provinces for health care has grown by 6 per cent every year, but the former Conservative government imposed a new formula based on economic growth with a minimum transfer increase of 3 per cent a year, beginning in 2017-2018.

“Federal Health Minister Jane Philpott, who lands at the meeting Tuesday, wants to keep the transfer formula off the table. She would rather talk about improving home, palliative and mental-health care and combatting opioid abuse. We’ll see how that goes. In a bid to put cash transfers on the agenda, some provincial finance ministers are even flying in to Toronto to attend the meetings.”

There’s a lot on the economic calendar, starting Monday with Ed Clark, Premier Kathleen Wynne’s business adviser, who’s speaking to a noon Canadian Club of Toronto gathering about “the growth we want.” (Presumably, it’s the kind that doesn’t add to the province’s swollen debt levels.)

Premier Brad Wall comes next, on Tuesday, with his state-of-the-province address to the Regina Chamber of Commerce.

Wednesday is a big day: The Bank of Canada releases its rate decision in the morning (no change expected) and releases its accompanying monetary policy report (watch for a housing warning).

“Ultimately, we see the BoC on hold through the end of 2017, supported by announced – and the potential for additional – fiscal stimulus,” said economists at Royal Bank of Canada.

And what better place to end the round of U.S. presidential debates than Las Vegas: Trump vs. Clinton at the University of Nevada.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Latest Videos

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies