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Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden is shown in an undated photo.

AL-JAZEERA/The Associated Press

Canada's spy agency says the death of terrorist leader Osama bin Laden hasn't extinguished al-Qaeda's desire to attack Western countries.

In its latest public report, covering the period 2011-13, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service says the al-Qaeda core remains a dangerous terrorist group.

CSIS says the group still intends to carry out spectacular attacks against the West and to influence others to do the same.

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The intelligence service expects the group's core will remain based in the Afghan-Pakistan border tribal areas for the foreseeable future, and that it will continue to pose a threat to Canadian security.

The report also says there have been a significant number of cyberattacks against Canadian agencies at all levels of government.

In addition, CSIS says it is aware of a wide range of such attacks against the private sector in Canada.

"The main targets are high-technology industries, including the telecommunications sector," the report says.

However, CSIS also knows of digital assaults against the oil and gas industry and other elements of the natural resource sector, as well as universities involved in research and development, the report adds.

"In addition to stealing intellectual property, state-sponsored attackers seek information which will give their domestic companies a competitive edge over Canadian firms."

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