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Bob Rae plans to work on mining issues with aboriginal communities near James Bay.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

Bob Rae has found a new home at his alma mater as he exits federal politics, taking up a part-time role as a fellow at the University of Toronto.

The former Liberal interim leader and premier of Ontario is joining the U of T's School of Public Policy and Governance as a distinguished senior fellow after announcing last month that he would resign his Toronto Centre seat, which he has held since 2008.

For the forseeable future, Mr. Rae's role at the U of T – where he earned his undergraduate degree and later studied law – will be part-time as he has also committed to be chief negotiator for First Nations in talks with the Ontario government about developing the Ring of Fire in northern Ontario.

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Having officially taken the post on July 1, Mr. Rae is expected to do some teaching and participate in classes but not leading his own courses. He'll also lend his expertise to students and faculty at university events and symposia.

"I think he'll just provide a great set of experiences for the students to engage with, and I think the faculty will benefit equally," said Mark Stabile, director of the public policy school, in an interview.

Mr. Rae, 64, is only the latest member of the Liberal fold to land at the U of T having left public life: in 2011, Michael Ignatieff (who was then also 64, and is a former classmate of Mr. Rae's) moved to the university to teach and take a residency at Massey College after losing his seat and resigning the Liberal leadership.

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