Skip to main content

Politics Justin Trudeau and Sophie Grégoire-Trudeau: Required reading on a political family

THE TRUDEAUS

JUSTIN AND SOPHIE: THE FAMILY ALBUM

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau watches the Oct. 19, 2015, results at a Montreal hotel with his mother Margaret (left), wife Sophie Grégoire, daughter Ella-Grace and sons Hadrien and Xavier.

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau watches the Oct. 19, 2015, results at a Montreal hotel with his mother Margaret (left), wife Sophie Grégoire-Trudeau, daughter Ella-Grace and sons Hadrien and Xavier.

PAUL CHIASSON/THE CANADIAN PRESS

He was raised at 24 Sussex Dr., the son of a rock-star prime minister. She's had a varied career as a journalist, activist and yoga instructor. Now they're Canada's top political power couple. We've prepared a tour through The Globe's archives to help you learn more about them

HIS FATHER'S SON

Justin Trudeau was born in Ottawa on Christmas Day in 1971, three years after "Trudeaumania" vaulted his father, Pierre Elliott Trudeau, into a majority Liberal government. In 2000, when he delivered the eulogy at his father's funeral, Justin remembered one memorable trip to Canadian Forces Station Alert in the Arctic, where he was taken on a secret mission to see "Santa Claus" hard at work making toys in his workshop.

Prime minister Pierre Trudeau cradles a young Justin under his arm in Ottawa on Aug. 10, 1973.

Prime minister Pierre Trudeau cradles a young Justin under his arm in Ottawa on Aug. 10, 1973.

PETER BREGG/THE CANADIAN PRESS



TRUDEAU THE TEACHER

Before entering politics, Justin Trudeau – who worked as a teacher and a board member of the Katimavik youth program founded by his father's government – had a long career working with youth, including the summers he spent as a counsellor at Camp Ahmek in Ontario's Algonquin Park. In 2013, after the Conservatives ran attack ads insinuating Mr. Trudeau's camp-counselling and school-teaching days made him too soft to lead the Liberals, Joanne Kates – director of Camp Arowhon in Algonquin Park, Ont. – offered this defence of why rounding up children made him even more qualified for leadership. (After his electoral victory in 2015, Ms. Kates followed up with an open letter to the prime-minister-designate with advice on putting his old camp-counselling skills to use.)

Justin Trudeau, 18, prepares a sailboat with fellow counsellor Marie Clement at Algonquin Park’s Camp Ahmek in 1992.

Justin Trudeau, 18, prepares a sailboat with fellow counsellor Marie Clement at Algonquin Park’s Camp Ahmek in 1992.

BRIAN MILNE



WHEN JUSTIN MET SOPHIE

As a young girl, Sophie Grégoire came to know the Trudeau family as a classmate of Justin Trudeau's younger brother, Michel, who died in an avalanche on a skiing trip in British Columbia in 1998. She got to know Justin better after the two met at a Montreal Grand Prix charity ball in 2003, and they were married two years later. They now have three children: Xavier, 8, Ella-Grace, 6, and 20-month-old Hadrien.

Story continues below advertisement

In 2013, during the Liberal leadership campaign, The Globe's John Allemang got to know Ms. Grégoire-Trudeau and observed how she brought "free-floating candour" instead of risk-averse caution to the role of political wife.

Justin Trudeau leaves with his new bride, Sophie Grégoire, in his father’s 1959 Mercedes 300 SEL after their marriage ceremony in Montreal on May 28, 2005.

Justin Trudeau leaves with his new bride, Sophie Grégoire, in his father’s 1959 Mercedes 300 SEL after their marriage ceremony in Montreal on May 28, 2005.

RYAN REMIORZ/THE CANADIAN PRESS



TRUDEAU IN THE RING

In 2008, Mr. Trudeau made a big move into federal politics by winning the Montreal riding of Papineau for the Liberals. With the Liberals in opposition, Mr. Trudeau took on portfolios ranging from youth issues to multiculturalism and citizenship. In 2012, he entered a different political arena – fighting Conservative Senator Patrick Brazeau in a charity boxing match, which he won.

Justin Trudeau and Conservative Senator Patrick Brazeau fight during their charity boxing match in Ottawa on March 31, 2012.

Justin Trudeau and Conservative Senator Patrick Brazeau fight during their charity boxing match in Ottawa on March 31, 2012.

CHRIS WATTIE/REUTERS



TRUDEAU ON THE RISE

In 2011, the Liberals suffered a severe blow in a federal election that left them in third-party status. Michael Ignatieff's resignation triggered a new leadership struggle, and Mr. Trudeau decided to put his name forward. He won the 2013 leadership race in a crushing victory – about 80 per cent of the votes – and pledged to rebuild the party.

Justin Trudeau arrives inside the Liberal leadership campaign event hall on April 14, 2013.

Justin Trudeau arrives inside the Liberal leadership campaign event hall on April 14, 2013.

PETER POWER/THE GLOBE AND MAIL



TRUDEAU ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL

The 2015 election – Canada's longest-ever, at 78 days – was a hard slog for the Trudeau team, in which he ran on an ambitious program of social programs and deficit spending and fought Conservative accusations that he was "just not ready." The Globe's Ian Brown took an in-depth look at Mr. Trudeau on the campaign trail (link available for subscribers only).

Justin Trudeau prepares a speech in Edmonton on June 4, 2015, with Amarjeet Sohi.

Justin Trudeau prepares a speech in Edmonton on June 4, 2015, with Amarjeet Sohi.

JOHN LEHMANN/THE GLOBE AND MAIL



TRUDEAU VICTORIOUS

The Liberals' majority victory on Oct. 19 was the biggest increase for a party between elections in Canadian history – a stunning reversal for a party that had only 34 seats when Mr. Trudeau took over the leadership. Here's The Globe's roundup of complete coverage from the morning after.

Justin Trudeau waves to supporters on election night in Montreal on Oct. 20, 2015.

Justin Trudeau waves to supporters on election night in Montreal on Oct. 20, 2015.

KEVIN VAN PAASSEN/BLOOMBERG

Highlights from Justin Trudeau’s acceptance speech: ‘I didn’t make history tonight. You did’

2:28


A TRUDEAU BIBLIOGRAPHY

Books on Pierre Trudeau's political career and family are in ample supply: The classics include Trudeau père's 1993 Memoirs and Richard Gwyn's The Northern Magus (1980).

During the 2015 election, The Globe prepared an e-book about Mr. Trudeau (as well as his two main opponents, Stephen Harper and Thomas Mulcair): All are available to registered globeandmail.com users here.

Story continues below advertisement

Here are some other Trudeau-related books that The Globe has reviewed in recent years.

Autobiographies:

History:

Canadians vote in a second Trudeau: A look back at the first ‘Trudeaumania’

1:02

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.