Skip to main content

Federal Liberal leader Justin Trudeau votes on a resolution during the party's convention in Montreal, Sunday, February 23, 2014.

Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press

The Liberal Party of Canada is in favour of decriminalizing medically assisted suicide, adopting a resolution on the controversial matter at the end of its four-day policy convention in Montreal.

The issue was decided in a tight vote at a plenary session at the convention on Sunday, signaling a clear position by the party in relation to assisted suicide for some critically ill patients. The resolution showcases a willingness of the Liberal Party to take a stance on issues of freedom and choice, offering a contrast with the positions of of the Conservative government.

The Liberal Party has already shaken Canadian politics by supporting the legalization of marijuana, attracting constant criticism on the matter from the Conservative Party.

Story continues below advertisement

Supporters of the motion on medically-assisted suicide told the convention that the issue was "a matter of choice, and we are the party of choice."

Still, there was opposition among Liberals, with one opponent of the resolution stating that the issue was "not speedier death," but rather improving paliative care to ensure "a truly caring death."

The resolution that was adopted reads as follows: "Be it resolved that voluntary medically-assisted death be de-criminalized after a public consultation process designed to make recommendations to Parliament with respect to the criteria for access and the appropriate oversight system for medically-assisted end-of-life."

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter