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Ms. Brosseau, standing behind Mr. Trudeau, clutches her chest in apparent shock after Mr. Trudeau elbowed her. She can be seen being forced back to an adjacent desk.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will not face any punishment for the tussle in which he grabbed a Conservative MP and subsequently elbowed an NDP MP in an effort to speed up a vote in the House of Commons.

A Commons committee decided on Tuesday to drop the matter, for which Mr. Trudeau has repeatedly apologized.

The procedure and House affairs committee passed a motion to take no further action after hearing a statement from NDP MP Ruth Ellen Brosseau, who was elbowed by the Prime Minister as he hurried Conservative Whip Gordon Brown to his seat for a vote on May 18.

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NDP MP David Christopherson delivered Ms. Brosseau's statement, as she is in China on a parliamentary trade trip.

"If anything impedes a parliamentarian from carrying out the role their constituents elected them to undertake, it constitutes a serious matter," Ms. Brosseau's statement said.

"In this case, it was the Prime Minister himself that caused this breach when his inappropriate physical intervention with Conservative Whip Gordon Brown on the floor of the House of Commons resulted in physical contact that caused me to miss a vote."

The statement went on to say Ms. Brosseau accepts Mr. Trudeau's apology. She also said she hopes that the House of Commons never sees this kind of conduct again and that parliamentarians commit to "improving the tone of debate in Parliament."

The incident, dubbed "Elbowgate," caught the attention of news media across Canada and around the world. It took place on the evening of May 18, when MPs were called back to the House of Commons for a vote to limit debate on Bill C-14, the government's contentious legislation on doctor-assisted dying.

Tensions were already growing earlier in the day when the Liberals moved a motion allowing the cabinet to control the House's schedule, as it aimed to pass C-14 by June 6.

As the Commons prepared for the vote, NDP MPs, including Leader Tom Mulcair and Ms. Brosseau, stood in the aisle, with Mr. Brown behind them trying to get to his seat for the vote. Mr. Trudeau, seeing Mr. Brown behind the New Democrats, strode over and pulled him through the group, elbowing Ms. Brosseau in the process. Mr. Trudeau and Mr. Mulcair then got into a yelling match over the encounter.

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After the MPs settled down, House of Commons Speaker Geoff Regan said it was inappropriate for members to "manhandle" each other.

Mr. Trudeau apologized in the House that night for his "unacceptable" behaviour, then made repeated apologies the following day.

The Conservatives eventually moved a question of privilege on the "physical molestation of the member from Berthier-Maskinongé [Ms. Brosseau]," which was followed by hours of debate in the House on May 19. The matter was then sent to the procedure and House affairs committee for further study. The committee spent about 15 minutes studying the incident on Tuesday before passing the motion to move on from it.

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