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Politics NDP candidate touts deep roots in new Toronto by-election video

Linda McQuaig, who won the NDP nomination in the by-election for Toronto Centre MP, speaks after winning in Toronto on Sunday, September 15, 2013.

Michelle Siu/The Globe and Mail

The battle of the journalists/income equalizers in Toronto Centre continues with a new video from NDP contestant Linda McQuaig that takes an indirect jab at her Liberal opponent for being a parachute candidate.

In the video, which will be released at 10 a.m. Monday, Ms. McQuaig talks about her deep roots in the riding that was left vacant when Bob Rae quit federal politics earlier this year. The New Democrats call the spot her "Love letter to Toronto Centre" and she spends much time fondly describing the various neighbourhoods.

"I am running in Toronto Centre because this is my home," she tells the camera. "I have lived in downtown Toronto for most of my life and my daughter and I have made our home here in Toronto Centre for the past 13 years."

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This is, of course, a poke at Liberal candidate Chrystia Freeland who was born in Alberta and has spent much of her career outside the country – though she did work for a couple years as an editor at The Globe and Mail in Toronto. Ms. Freeland recently signed a deal on a three-storey townhouse in the riding that has been a Liberal stronghold.

The video, which will be posted to Ms. McQuaig's campaign website and promoted through social media, follows another posted to the Internet last week in which she challenges Ms. Freeland to a debate.

As the perceived front runner, Ms. Freeland has become the target of attack by both the New Democrats and the Conservatives. The Tories have also taken shots at the fact that she lived abroad for many years.

The by-election will be held Nov. 25, along with another in Quebec and two in Manitoba.

A survey conducted by Forum Research on Oct 17 and 18 suggested that Ms. Freeland then had the support of 45 per cent of decided and leaning voters, compared to Ms. McQUaig who had 30 per cent support. The Conservatives had the support of 18 per cent of those polled and the Greens had 7 per cent.

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