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Politics Nova Scotia to launch major public-education review

The Nova Scotia government is poised to conduct a sweeping review of the province's public education system, saying the last time it went under the microscope was 25 years ago.

"Think about how much has changed in the last 25 years," Premier Stephen McNeil said Tuesday, adding that the process will go beyond the curriculum review he promised during the election campaign last fall.

Among other things, McNeil said the review will look at the length of the school day, the length of the academic year and the use of technology in classrooms.

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"It will be a broader deeper dive," McNeil said in a speech to the Halifax Chamber of Commerce.

"We need to make sure that we're providing the next generation of young Nova Scotians with the skills required to meeting the ever-changing demands of our economy."

The study will be conducted by a group of prominent Nova Scotians, though McNeil didn't say who would be on the panel.

The terms of the review panel and its membership were scheduled to be announced Wednesday by Education Minister Karen Casey.

During the election campaign, McNeil also promised to cap class size at 20 students for primary to Grade 2, and at 25 for grades 3 to 6.

The Liberals also promised to boost support for students with special needs by spending more on education assistants, speech pathologists, psychologists and on early intervention programs.

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