Skip to main content

The Globe and Mail

On the campaign trail: The weekend photo recap

The party leaders: Where they went and what they said on Saturday April 2 and Sunday April 3

1 of 4

After a break from campaigning on Saturday, Conservative leader Stephen Harper promised more fitness tax breaks during a campaign stop in Ottawa on Sunday. Mr. Harper promises to double the current fitness tax credit for children to cover $1,000 of sports and recreation fees. The Tories are also planning a fitness tax credit for adults that would give people breaks on gym memberships and other athletic expenses. But this second measure for adults would not take effect until the federal budget is balanced, which is currently forecast to take place in four years.

Sean Kilpatrick/Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press

2 of 4

After taking Saturday off, Liberal Leader Michael Ignatieff unveiled an $8.2-billion election platform Sunday morning. The two-year plan would give new money to middle class families as part of the so-called "Family Pack" but does not spell out how or when the deficit would be erased. Key policies aimed at strengthening families include a 1-billion program to help students get to university and college and a $400-million Green Renovation tax credit. Most of the new spending comes from the Liberal vow to reverse corporate tax cuts - freeing up $5.2-billion by the second year. The 94-page document also includes a sprinkling of smaller measures to attract rural voters, new Canadians and youth. The Liberals also vowed to bring back the mandatory long-form census and to create a “People’s Question Period”.After a break from campaigning on Saturday, Conservative leader Stephen Harper promised more fitness tax breaks during a campaign stop in Ottawa on Sunday. Mr. Harper promises to double the current fitness tax credit for children to cover $1,000 of sports and recreation fees. The Tories are also planning a fitness tax credit for adults that would give people breaks on gym memberships and other athletic expenses. But this second measure for adults would not take effect until the federal budget is balanced, which is currently forecast to take place in four years.

Nathan Denette/Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press

3 of 4

On Saturday, NDP Leader Jack Layton’s Halifax event that addressed veterans’ issues included a surprise appearance by outspoken former veterans' ombudsman Pat Stogran. The New Democrats say they would end pension reductions for retired and disabled veterans, restore an income-security insurance plan for former members of the Forces, overhaul the Veterans Review and Appeal Board, hold a public inquiry into the use of the defoliant Agent Orange at CFB Gagetown, and help veterans move to construction and building trades. After his speech, Mr. Layton found himself fending off questions about attracting a relatively small crowd of 400 and a seeming lack of energy during the first week of this campaign. On Sunday, Mr. Layton took his campaign bus to a maple-sugar bush in the Aylmer area, west of Hull, to profile two candidates in hopes of making a breakthrough in Quebec.

Paul Chiasson/Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press

4 of 4

On Saturday, Bloc Québécois Leader Gilles Duceppe worked to win back key election turf in the Quebec City area by ripping into controversial independent incumbent Andre Arthur. He accused Mr. Arthur of making a mockery of the democratic process, noting his high absentee rate in the House of Commons. While serving as an MP, Mr. Arthur moonlighted as a bus driver and recorded commercials for radio. Mr. Arthur has said driving a bus helps him keep in touch with real people and real issues. On a Sunday campaign stop in Sherbrooke, Que., Mr. Duceppe voiced support for a Quebec legislature committee to take a closer look into the safety of asbestos mining.

Jacques Boissinot/Jacques Boissinot/The Canadian Press

Story continues below advertisement

Report an error