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Students at the University of Guelph have been listening to Rick Mercer.

The politically engaged Canadian funny man has been telling them to get out and vote.

Mr. Mercer says it is the conventional wisdom of all political parties that youth do not vote. And he's right. But so are the political parties. The voter turnout of people between the ages of 18 and 24 is, well, abysmal.

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A group of students arrived at Parliament Hill a month ago to say that the criminalization of certain drugs disproportionately target people in their generation and they would like the politicians to reform drug policies and put money into prevention, education and harm reduction rather than punishment.

Likewise, student groups across Canada complain that governments talk about making post-secondary education more affordable but the response to the problem has been baby steps.

Politicians are instead focused on the issues of the elderly because the elderly turn out to vote.

Mr. Mercer says this time youth should do something unexpected and take 20 minutes out of their day to cast a ballot.

The students at the University of Guelph have responded. These are the same kids who last year did a video in which they took off their clothes to highlight climate change.

Now they have put together this offering to inspire other young people to vote.

And they are issuing a challenge to other campuses across Canada to do the same. The message is: "We want political leaders to know we're voting and we won't be letting them off easy!"

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