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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks with the media after participating in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Summit in Manila, Philippines, on Nov. 14, 2017.

Adrian Wyld/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Good morning,

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will outline Canada's peacekeeping plans during a UN conference in Vancouver, committing soldiers and equipment for a number of operations around the world. A source familiar with the plans told The Globe and Mail that Canada will depart from the practice of picking one country and contributing to a continuing mission.

Last year, the Liberal government pledged $400-million and 600 soldiers for future peacekeeping missions but hadn't said exactly how, or where, those resources would be deployed.  Former general Roméo Dallaire, who is also at this week's conference, says Canada needs to step up its UN peacekeeping commitments: "Great nations are not nations that hold their capabilities back."

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TODAY'S HEADLINES

Days before talks resume for the North American free-trade agreement, Canada is launching a challenge under NAFTA Chapter 19 to the United States' punitive tariffs on softwood lumber.

As Canada prepares to get into free-trade talks with China, a U.S. congressional watchdog is recommending the United States be much more cautious of Chinese investment in its country.

Hassan Diab, an Ottawa professor who has been awaiting trial in France for three years, has had his eighth release order quashed by French authorities. Mr. Diab's wife is urging the Canadian government to intervene in the case.

One of the biggest federal public servants' unions says the government should stop trying to fix the Phoenix pay system, and just scrap it altogether.

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A Hill Times analysis shows 60 per cent of the Liberal government's political staff are men, and few women are hired for the economic portfolios.

A new promise-tracker from the government gives the government pretty good marks on how it's doing so far, though the website revealed the Liberals have dropped plans to waive the GST on construction of new rental units.

Vancouver has become the first major Canadian city to legalize Airbnb and similar short-term rental services, but the new rules only allow Airbnb hosts to rent out a room in their primary residence or the entire unit while they're away on vacation.

Legislators in Saskatchewan are mourning MLA Kevin Phillips, who died earlier this week. Mr. Phillips, 63, was first elected for the governing Saskatchewan Party for the riding of Melfort, northeast of Saskatoon.

In Britain, Prime Minister Theresa May says Russian President Vladimir Putin is interfering in other countries' elections. "I have a very simple message for Russia. We know what you are doing. And you will not succeed," she said.

Australians have voted to legalize same-sex marriage.

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Zimbabwe's military is making moves to take over the country, leaving questions about what will happen to President Robert Mugabe.

U.S. Senate Republicans are trying to finally get part of their Obamacare repeal done by adding it to their tax-reform bill.

And with prominent men – from Harvey Weinstein to a British cabinet minister – facing repercussions for their sexual harassment or assaults, here is the case for a "reckoning" for Bill Clinton and the various allegations levelled at him during his years as Arkansas governor and U.S. president.

Campbell Clark (The Globe and Mail) on the new Liberal promise-tracker: "The promise to 'balance the budget by 2019-20,' a task given to Finance Minister Bill Morneau as item No. 1 in his mandate letter, is listed as 'underway with challenges.' Unfortunately, that only applies if you remove the deadline of 'by 2019-20,' which certainly won't be met, and the phrase 'balance the budget,' which is nowhere in any specific plan put forward by the current government."

Robyn Urback (CBC) on the Liberal promise-tracker: "Among the government's 'completed' promises is one of increased accountability in question period, which we should assume is an attempt at some very dry government humour considering the seamless way that robotic non-answers have transitioned from the Harper benches to those of Trudeau."

André Picard (The Globe and Mail) on taxing legalized marijuana: "The only thing a tax exemption for medical marijuana would do is encourage recreational users to dream up ailments to save a buck. That's why there is no jurisdiction where such an exemption exists."

Joe Clark and Bience Gawanas (The Globe and Mail) on global pluralism: "A new global conversation about diversity is urgently needed. While every society in the world today is diverse in some way – the West, developing countries and emerging powers – diversity is often seen as a threat. Efforts to eliminate difference and impose the will of the majority drive far too many of today's conflicts. We see this in Myanmar where Rohingya Muslims are being cruelly persecuted for their beliefs."

Andrew Leach (The Globe and Mail) on Keystone XL: "In oil markets, easy wins and sure bets are hard to find. For a province such as Alberta, however, a long-term commitment to KXL is as close to that as we're going to get."

Glenn McGillivray (The Globe and Mail) on fighting wildfires: "We can't continue to make suppression the backbone of wildland fire management in this country. We shouldn't, and with a future state that will include more and larger fires on the landscape (and more assets in the way), we won't be able to. We won't have the resources to knock down every fire, we will be forced to pick and choose."

John Robson (National Post) on the strength of our democratic systems: "In some sense, voters have always been the greatest weakness in Western democracy. But also its greatest strength. All human institutions are fallible because all humans are fallible. And the great argument for self-government, as one aspect of a determinedly open society even when it hurts or smells, is that it corrects mistakes far better than any other system."

David Von Drehle (Washington Post) on Alabama's Roy Moore: "Mainstream Muslims have been hearing for years that they must repudiate the hateful fringe perverting their religion; surely the same applies to us Christians. Stirring up hatred for gays, liberals, Muslims and other supposed infidels, Moore bears a familial resemblance — the nonviolent side of the family — to the jihadists of the Islamic State. He brandishes a revolver instead of a broadsword, but he shares their delight in condemnation, division and (evidently) fantasies of virgins."

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