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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau responds to a question during question period in the House of Commons on Wednesday.

Adrian Wyld/THE CANADIAN PRESS

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> It's the final few days for the House of Commons before its six-week-long winter break, and MPs are ready to head home. There will be a rush of announcements to get out the door this week, including a ban on asbestos. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will give a wide-ranging end-of-session news conference at 11:30 a.m. ET in Ottawa, and the duo of Health Minister Jane Philpott and Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale will make an "important" drug-related announcement this afternoon.

> Mr. Trudeau has been dogged this fall with news about cash-for-access fundraisers, where people can pay up to $1,500 a ticket for a small soirée with the Prime Minister, Finance Minister or other members of cabinet. Mr. Trudeau has said the events aren't a big deal, and that no senior Liberal could be swayed by that amount of money. So what do Canadians think? We asked Nanos Research to find out. Almost two-thirds of respondents disapproved of the fundraisers, while half said $1,500 was enough money to buy influence. More about the poll here.

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> The federal government and eight provinces struck a deal late Friday to make major investments in clean technology and put a price on carbon, in a bid to dramatically lower Canada's greenhouse-gas emissions. The two provinces left out so far – Manitoba and Saskatchewan – will have pricing imposed on their markets if they don't figure out their own system by 2018. The deal is part of a strategy that saw Mr. Trudeau approve two pipelines, including one to B.C.'s coast, which is causing no end of consternation there. In the meantime, the price of oil is inching back up and the CEO of Exxon Mobil may be the next U.S. Secretary of State.

> The number of veterans who served in Afghanistan and retired will soon be more than the number of currently active soldiers.

> Canada is hoping to lead an international charge to get global giants like Netflix and Facebook to invest in domestic cultural industries.

> And how the future site of an Ottawa hospital got decided – and the role of Environment Minister Catherine McKenna, who represents the riding of Ottawa Centre – is a fascinating case study in political management and mismanagement.

WHAT EVERYONE'S TALKING ABOUT

Justine Hunter (Globe and Mail): "For third parties who have something to say about the [upcoming B.C.] election – unions, corporations, NGOs and individuals – the rules are different. While Ontario and Alberta lead campaign-finance reform, B.C. increasingly looks like the Wild West. However, this province is the only one in Canada that requires people or groups to register to engage in election advertising, no matter how small a statement they make. Election advertising, under B.C. law, is so broad in its definition that it includes making a lawn sign with cardboard and crayons." (for subscribers)

Preston Manning (Globe and Mail): "The analogy between an oil well blowout and an unexpected and uncontrolled upsurge of populism is instructive. On the positive side, highly valuable resources are at play in both cases – petroleum worth millions of dollars on the one hand and the political energy of millions of people on the other hand – energy which if constructively harnessed can be of great benefit to the economy and society. But on the negative side, if the tapping into and release of that energy is not constructively managed, disaster can be the result."

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Globe editorial board: "Mr. Trump's intemperance reminds us of two facts: One, that his skin is so thin as to be non-existent; and, two, he will never stop using Twitter as part of a personal strategy to rile the media and keep critics off-balance. It's working for him now, because he's not president yet. The real test will come when he has to work with Congress to get his agenda implemented."

Sheila Copps (Hill Times): "Electoral reform will not happen in this Parliament. It may never happen. It is certainly not the top of mind issue that moves voters. If anything, it is a party issue for those who cannot make the breakthrough to government."

Michael Den Tandt (National Post): "Indeed the entire federal-provincial climate strategy is more an exercise in political symbolism than a quantifiable process that will result in the preservation of Canada's environment for 'our kids and grandkids,' as the talking point tells us incessantly. This is not a pipeline proposal in service of a climate strategy, as some have surmised, but the opposite. That's not a knock against the plan but a fact: Climate is global. Nearly a third of the world's emissions in 2015 were produced in China. … So Canada's relatively mature, slow-growth economy, which accounted for 1.7 per cent of total emissions last year, could go carbon-free tomorrow and not make a globally significant dent."

Written by Chris Hannay. Edited by Steven Proceviat.

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If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

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