Skip to main content

Queen Elizabeth II attends the Inauguration Of The Tenth General Synod at London’s Westminster Abbey on Nov. 24, 2015.

JONATHAN BRADY/WPA POOL/GETTY IMAGES

This is the Globe's daily politics newsletter. Sign up to get it by e-mail each morning.

POLITICS NOTEBOOK

By Chris Hannay (@channay)

Story continues below advertisement

As Justin Trudeau visits Britain today for his first full bilateral trip, here are some facts about the Canada-U.K. relationship.

1. The United Kingdom is Canada's third largest trading partner, after the United States and China.

2. Top Canadian exports to Britain: Gold ($8.7-billion), nickel ($901-million), crude oil ($756-million), scrap precious metal ($508-million), uranium ($415-million). Top British exports to Canada: Gold ($1.1-billion), light oil ($732-million), airplane or helicopter parts ($622-million), turbo-jet parts ($342-million), motor vehicle spark ignition ($324-million).

3. British GDP: $3.26-trillion. Canadian GDP: $1.97-trillion.

4. British GDP per capita: $50,506. Canadian GDP per capita: $55,559.

5. Britain: 64 million people in 243,610 square kilometres. Canada: 35 million people across 9.99 million square kilometres.

6. Canada's High Commissioner to Britain is Gordon Campbell, a former premier of British Columbia. Britain's High Commissioner to Canada is Howard Drake, a career diplomat.

Story continues below advertisement

7. The Queen is Canada's constitutional monarch, and separately Britain's head of state. The two offices – in Canada and the United Kingdom – are not the same.

8. The Queen will meet her 12th Canadian prime minister. She has known 13 British PMs.

9. The Queen has reigned for over 63 years. British Prime Minister David Cameron has served for five years. Mr. Trudeau has been PM for a month.

10. And, of course, there's this photograph.

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS MORNING

By Evan Annett (@kingdomofevan)

Story continues below advertisement

> The Liberal government says it will miss its deadline to bring 25,000 Syrian refugees to Canada by the new year, taking more time to screen refugee applicants abroad.

> Canada's NATO ambassador will help to de-escalate the "tense situation" between Turkey and Russia over the destruction of a Russian fighter jet on Tuesday, Mr. Trudeau says.

> Canada's deputy minister of Veterans Affairs says the department needs to overcome its "shortcomings" and do more to care for wounded veterans and their families.

> NDP Leader Tom Mulcair promises that he'll stay on as party leader as the New Democrats get ready for a leadership review in April.

> Shipyard companies are pressing the federal government to open up bidding on a plan to convert a civilian cargo vessel into a Navy supply ship.

SECUREDROP

Story continues below advertisement

Did you know you can share information with Globe journalists with much more security and anonymity than traditional means? Read more about SecureDrop and encrypted communication.

WHAT EVERYONE'S TALKING ABOUT

" Now that the plan for resettling refugees has been set out in detail, Mr. Trudeau will be under pressure to detail another major endeavour, the new Canadian mission against the Islamic State. The symbolism is important. Allies such as France will want to see Mr. Trudeau unveiling a military mission that seems like Canada is beefing up its commitment, even as it pulls out the CF-18s."

Campbell Clark (for subscribers) on the Prime Minister's foreign-policy priorities.

David McLaughlin (The Globe and Mail): "Sweetness and light en route to Paris should neither sugar-coat the tough low-carbon economic transition ahead nor obscure the trying political choices 90 days hence. Still, we should not begrudge the splendid start. That would be so un-Canadian."

Lysiane Gagnon (The Globe and Mail): "Nevertheless, the prospect of seeing 25,000 Syrians settle over a short period raises worries; in Quebec for instance, where a CROP survey taken after the Paris terrorist attacks showed that 60 per cent of the population is against the idea of receiving so many refugees. … The reflex of fear was amplified by the bloody events in Paris that echoed especially loudly in Quebec, which feels so close to France, especially in times of distress."

Story continues below advertisement

Basem Boshra (Montreal Gazette): "So judging the Charbonneau Commission's work today – or next week, or even next year – is premature. Sure, it cost us a mint just to get to this point. But before we definitively pronounce on its success or failure, let's first allow our investment some time to mature and see what it ultimately yields."

Justin Ling (Vice): "I'm going to explain to you how the Trudeau government, despite all of its rosy, journalist-loving rhetoric, just repeated the first thing that the Harper government did upon taking power."

This newsletter is produced by Evan Annett, Steve Proceviat and Chris Hannay.

Welcome to the Globe Politics newsletter! Let us know what you think.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter
To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies