Skip to main content
Access every election story that matters
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week for 24 weeks
Access every election story that matters
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

Alberta Premier Jim Prentice speaks in Edmonton, on September 15, 2014.

JASON FRANSON/The Canadian Press

Premier Jim Prentice announced new measures Friday to clean up outstanding claims from last year's disastrous southern Alberta floods, and to prevent them from happening again.

Prentice said 12 new people will be hired to clear up the backlog of disaster claims. And new construction projects have been given the go-ahead to divert and contain river overflow.

"Last summer's flood-stricken cities and towns need comprehensive projects that are going to make them more resilient," Prentice told a news conference.

Story continues below advertisement

"As certain as we're standing here today, we all know that floods are going to happen again in southern Alberta."

The government said that more than 10,500 claims were made after the flooding in June 2013.

More than 8,000 claims have since been settled, but Prentice said he wants the rest wrapped up by the end of the year.

"The last thing that the victims of last year's flood need is more red tape," he said.

"We are going to put forward on a best efforts basis an attempt to clear up most if not all of the outstanding appeals files by December of 2014."

Prentice said they will triple the number of officers to hear claims to 18 from six.

He said the province will also build a south diversion of the Highwood River to protect the town of High River, which saw 13,000 people forced from their homes.

Story continues below advertisement

"It's anticipated that this diversion will provide one-in-300-year flood protection to the residents of High River," he said.

Prentice said a dry reservoir will also be developed in the Springbank area, west of Calgary, to help protect the city from flooding along the Elbow River.

He said homes in the area of the dry reservoir will be raised or relocated to higher ground, adding that 15 families will be directly affected.

He said those families will be treated and compensated fairly.

"Government is required to make tough decisions from time to time, and this is one of those occasions," he said.

Evacuation zones will be created to help people get out and rescuers get in during floods.

Story continues below advertisement

Each of the projects will range from $150 million to $200 million and are expected to be completed within three years.

Prentice said a deal will also be struck with TransAlta to ensure that the Ghost Reservoir near Cochrane will be able to accommodate overflow from the Bow River to protect Calgary.

The changes, said Prentice, "will essentially provide Calgary immediately with one-in-100-year flood security protection."

About 120,000 people were believed to have been affected after 350 mm of rain fell over two days in late June of 2013, wiping out roads, bridges, and swamping streets, homes, and vehicles in the region.

NDP critic Deron Bilous questioned the timing of Prentice's announcement given that Prentice's education minister, Gordon Dirks, will soon be running in a Calgary byelection to gain a seat in the legislature.

"This government has been dragging its feet on funding the necessary disaster recovery resources," said Bilous.

Story continues below advertisement

"The timing of today's announcement raises suspicion of an attempt to win votes in Calgary-Elbow."

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies