Skip to main content

Conservative Senator Pamela Wallin prepares to chair the Senate national security and defence committee in Ottawa February 25, 2013. REUTERS/Chris Wattie (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS HEADSHOT)

CHRIS WATTIE/REUTERS

The RCMP has begun interviews with senators about Pamela Wallin's expense claims, widening an investigation launched earlier this year.

Ms. Wallin was ordered to repay more than $100,000 in questionable claims and about $14,000 in interest last month after an independent audit found she had billed the Red Chamber for expenses that were not related to her work as a senator.

She repaid the money in mid-September, but has maintained in her public statements that she was treated unfairly by the auditors and the Senate committee that ordered the review.

Story continues below advertisement

Senator Marjory LeBreton, who stepped down from her position as the government leader in the Senate earlier this year, confirmed that she was interviewed by the RCMP about Ms. Wallin's expense claims earlier this month.

Ms. Wallin is the fourth senator to come under scrutiny by police during the past year. Senators Mike Duffy, Patrick Brazeau and Mac Harb are also under investigation by the RCMP.

The Senate's internal economy committee, which requested the audit into Ms. Wallin's expenses, referred the matter to police last month after receiving the auditor's report.

The audit, conducted by Deloitte, listed dozens of claims Ms. Wallin made for trips auditors said were related to partisan or personal events. They also pointed out that the Senator's Microsoft Outlook calendar appeared "inconsistent" with previously archived versions, with meetings added, changed or deleted.

Earlier this month, Ms. Wallin said she would welcome an "independent and objective review" by police and would co-operate fully with any investigation. "I have not done anything wrong. I am not guilty of any misconduct," she wrote in the statement.

A former broadcast journalist who was appointed to the Senate by Prime Minister Stephen Harper, Ms. Wallin resigned from the Conservative caucus in May.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter