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Quebec Premier Jean Charest waves after he unveiled his cabinet at the National Assembly in Quebec City on Dec. 18, 2008.

MATHIEU BELANGER/REUTERS/Mathieu Belanger

In a speech at the University of Ottawa last week, Gilles Duceppe cited climate change policies as another reason that Quebec would be better off as a separate country. For that reason alone, federalists should keep a close eye on what's actually going on in the distinct society.

This morning, Le Devoir reports that Jean Charest's government has invited Quebec business people to "seize the opportunities" in the oil sands as part of a subsidized trade mission to Edmonton, from March 22-25.

Meanwhile, La Presse is reporting that Ontario's Minister Sandra Pupatello says that Quebec's tailpipe emissions standards are a complete waste of time as the province only represents 4 per cent of the North America market and will have to adjust its standards when continent-wide standards are put in place.

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And the New York Times reports that, because of economic concerns, Arizona has pulled out of the Western Climate Initiative, of which Quebec is a member, which is supposed to inaugurate a cap-and-trade program in 2012.

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