Skip to main content

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau speaks with the media following party caucus in Ottawa on October 8, 2014.

Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau is signalling the tax cuts promised by the Conservative government could lead to a political showdown ahead of the 2015 federal election.

Trudeau suggested in an interview today with CBC's French-language service Radio-Canada that a Liberal government would prioritize investment in infrastructure, education, and research over any tax relief.

He says he's made a promise as leader of the party to build an economy with a strong and growing middle class.

Story continues below advertisement

Trudeau made the comments in response to a question on Radio-Canada's Les coulisses du pouvoir about the cost of those planned investments, and whether it would be politically difficult for him to reverse any cuts given to taxpayers.

Finance Minister Joe Oliver hinted last week cuts could be announced as soon as the annual fall economic update.

Oliver has said plans to balance the budget in 2015 remain on track despite the falling price of oil.

The Prime Minister's Office chastised Trudeau for his remarks, saying the government is intent on providing tax relief to Canadians.

In contrast, spokesman Jason MacDonald says, Trudeau will hike taxes to "spend billion of dollars" expanding government.

A Trudeau official, meantime, said the government has put forward a poorly designed tax cut while the Liberals have offered a counter-proposal focused on jobs and growth.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies