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With the Toronto casino issue looming for the city of Toronto, some neighbourhoods in the city have seen anti-casino signs popping up on front lawnsFred Lu/The Globe and Mail

Councillor Mary Fragedakis wants to know the cost of Toronto's casino consideration.

Ms. Fragedakis has sent a letter to city manager Joe Pennachetti "to obtain information related to the direct, indirect and opportunity costs associated with the casino file." The letter was written last week, but surfaced publicly Thursday when the agenda for the next city council meeting was released.

City council last month voted against both a new downtown casino and expanded gaming at Woodbine. Ms. Fragedakis was against both options.

Her letter does not explain why she is interested in the costs associated with the casino file, but she asks for three things:

– An itemized accounting of all the City of Toronto staff time and other expenses, including out-of-pocket expenses, involved in the negotiations, public consultations, researching, reporting and any other aspect of the Ontario and Lottery Gaming Corporation's proposed expansion of gaming in Toronto;

– An itemized accounting of any consultants' time and other expenses, including out-of-pocket expenses, engaged in the negotiations, public consultations, researching, reporting and any other aspect of the Ontario and Lottery Gaming Corporation's proposed expansion of gaming in Toronto;

– An analysis of what other City of Toronto projects were delayed and by how long in order for the City of Toronto to consider the Ontario and Lottery Gaming Corporation's proposed expansion of gaming in Toronto.

Ms. Fragedakis, in an e-mail statement, said she made the inquiry because it's important Torontonians know how much the casino process cost.

"Once we know the costs, we can talk about what, if anything, to do next. Maybe we should ask the province to consider paying the costs of the consultation. Maybe we should develop a protocol whereby if any one comes to us again with such a suggestion, that we make them pay the full cost up front," Ms. Fragedakis wrote.

"Everyone says Toronto has to compete on the world stage. To do so, you come up with a plan. Sure you adapt that plan as needed, but this was more of a chasing-after-shiny-baubles than an adaptation. I think knowing the real costs will help us get to work on the challenges facing Toronto."

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