Skip to main content
// //

Toronto Councillor Giorgio Mammoliti holds the sign that reads ‘Doug’ that he taped over the ‘Rob Ford’ nameplate in council chambers on Tuesday, May 6, 2014.

Mark Blinch/The Globe and Mail

With one Ford absent from Toronto city council, speculation ran rampant at City Hall Tuesday that another might consider running to take his place.

Councillor Doug Ford, the older brother of Mayor Rob Ford – who is currently taking a leave of absence to address his substance abuse – did not close the door when asked by reporters about the possibility of running for mayor.

The councillor was seen sitting in his brother's usual council seat at various points Tuesday, and when one reporter asked if he'd consider running in his place, he replied "I have no comment."

Story continues below advertisement

Doug Ford had previously announced that he would not be running again as the councillor for Ward 2. He also told reporters earlier this year that he'd put off his plans for a provincial run in favour of working on his brother's mayoral re-election campaign.

At least one of his council colleagues said he'd support Councillor Ford if he ran. Councillor Giorgio Mammoliti, a sometimes ally of the Ford brothers, hand wrote a "Doug Ford" sign in council Tuesday afternoon, which he jokingly affixed atop the mayor's nameplate.

When approached by reporters afterward, Mr. Mammoliti said "someone has to" run under the Ford banner.

But several other councillors reacted with skepticism.

"No, I would not be voting Doug Ford for mayor," said Councillor Jaye Robinson, who stepped down from the mayor's executive committee last year after the mayor refused to seek help for his substance abuse.

"I think we need a mayor with integrity and a mayor who's going to lead us, and a mayor who can collaborate and work in a collaborative way. I don't think Doug has that skill set or those attributes."

Councillor Denzil Minnan-Wong – a former ally of the Fords who said he spoke with the mayor Tuesday on the telephone and that he was in "good spirits" – also said he would not support Doug Ford for mayor.

Story continues below advertisement

"I don't believe he has what it takes to be mayor," he said. "With respect."

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies