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While air travellers endured another day of chaos at Toronto's Pearson International Airport, transit commuters were warned to expect extra-long waits in chilling temperatures during the afternoon rush hour.

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Airport workers walk under an Air Canada plane at Pearson Airport. Heavy delays are affecting the flights because of the extreme cold in Toronto on January 07 2014.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

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After waiting in line for 8 hours Nadim Assi finally is ready to check in to his flight to Edmonton where he lives. Heavy delays affect Pearson Airport due the extreme cold , Toronto, January 07 2014.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

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"I should be in class by now" says Robert Neal (centre with red hat) who, along with friend Megan Brooks rest after waiting in line for 5 hours to take his flight to Thunder Bay where he is going to University. Heavy delays affect Pearson Airport due to the extreme cold in Toronto on January 07 2014.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

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Many people donned heavy coats, scarves and mittens to help cover their faces as they navigate the St. George St. and Bloor St. West intersection on Jan. 7 2014. A Polar vortex over parts of North America dropped temperatures in Toronto to bitterly cold levels with wind chills making it feel like -37 with other parts of the country feeling even colder.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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Pedestrians walk through the wall of steam coming from a street level vent at the corner of King St. West and Bay St. on Jan. 7 2014. A Polar vortex over parts of North America dropped temperatures in Toronto to bitterly cold levels with wind chills making it feel like -37 with other parts of the country feeling even colder.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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The deep freeze continues across the continent and in Toronto. The skyline is seen beyond the ice buildup at Humber Bay park as Lake Ontario's water freezes on contact as it splashes ashore.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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Many people donned heavy coats, scarves and mittens to help cover their faces as they navigate the St. George St. and Bloor St. West intersection on Jan. 7 2014. A Polar vortex over parts of North America dropped temperatures in Toronto to bitterly cold levels with wind chills making it feel like -37 with other parts of the country feeling even colder.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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The deep freeze continues across the continent and in Toronto. The skyline is seen beyond the ice buildup at Humber Bay park as Lake Ontario's water freezes on contact as it splashes ashore.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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Unbroken by marks from skates, the smooth surface of the skating rink at Nathan Phillip Square sits empty on Jan. 7 2014. A Polar vortex over parts of North America dropped temperatures in Toronto to bitterly cold levels with wind chills making it feel like -37 with other parts of the country feeling even colder.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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A woman covers her face as she emerges into the frigid temperatures after exiting the King subway station at Yonge St. on Jan. 7 2014. A Polar vortex over parts of North America dropped temperatures in Toronto to bitterly cold levels with wind chills making it feel like -37 with other parts of the country feeling even colder.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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A sea bird flies across the misty waters of Lake Ontario off of Humber Bay Park in Toronto on Jan. 7, 2014. The continent is in the midst of a deep freeze but temperatures are expected to be more seasonal after Tuesday.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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Ada Maciejewski pulls her scarf up to fend off the bitter winds while waiting for a streetcar on KIng St. West on Jan. 7 2014. Ada found the wind chill really cold and that this is definitely Canada. A Polar vortex over parts of North America dropped temperatures in Toronto to bitterly cold levels with wind chills making it feel like -37 with other parts of the country feeling even colder.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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