Skip to main content

Toronto Mayor Ford decides he’s not up to attending Remembrance Day event

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford underwent his third round of chemotherapy last week for a rare and aggressive form of cancer.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, who was expected to deliver a speech at Tuesday morning's Remembrance Day ceremony, will not attend the event after all.

Mr. Ford, whose controversial term as Toronto mayor officially ends at the beginning of December, was expected to make one of his last official appearances at the Old City Hall ceremony.

But on Monday afternoon, Mr. Ford's chief of staff, Dan Jacobs, said the mayor, who underwent his third round of chemotherapy last week for a rare and aggressive form of cancer, will not be able to attend.

Story continues below advertisement

"He's still not 100 per cent sure if he's up for it," Mr. Jacobs said in an interview.

"But he understands it's a very important ceremony, it's close to his heart, so he doesn't want to leave it as a last-minute decision."

Instead, Councillor Ceta Ramkhalawansingh, who represents the downtown ward where the ceremony will take place, will speak on the mayor's behalf.

Toronto's mayor-elect John Tory, who will be sworn in next month, will attend the Remembrance Day ceremony as a guest.

City spokesman David Clark said event organizers are expecting more people than usual for this year's ceremony, in light of last month's shooting death of Corporal Nathan Cirillo in Ottawa.

He would not comment specifically on security precautions, but he said the presence of Toronto police officers will probably be heightened near Old City Hall.

Tuesday's ceremony will include a moment of silence, a flypast by the Canadian Harvard Aircraft Association and remarks delivered in English, French and Ojibway.

Story continues below advertisement

Last year, Mr. Ford's presence at the Remembrance Day ceremony – wearing his chain of office just one week after admitting he had smoked crack cocaine – drew mixed reactions. Still, he said late last month that he was determined to attend again this year.

"I hope I'm here if I'm not in the hospital," he told reporters during a visit to City Hall.

"Remembrance Day is a big event for me."

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter