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Constable James Forcillo briefly appeared before a disciplinary hearing at Toronto Police headquarters on a charge of discreditable conduct under the Police Services Act in the shooting of Sammy Yatim.

Chris Young/The Canadian Press

A disciplinary charge against a Toronto police officer charged in the shooting death of a young man on a streetcar has been put on hold until the end of the criminal case.

Constable James Forcillo briefly appeared before a disciplinary hearing at Toronto Police headquarters Thursday on a charge of discreditable conduct under the Police Services Act.

Toronto Police Association president Mike McCormack said before the hearing that the charge is laid any time an officer is charged with a criminal offence.

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Forcillo, 30, is charged with second-degree murder in the death of 18-year-old Sammy Yatim, who was shot multiple times and tasered on an empty streetcar in July.

The incident was captured on surveillance and cellphone video on which nine shots can be heard following shouts for Yatim to drop a knife.

McCormack says penalties for a finding of guilt on the disciplinary charge can range from a suspension of a few days to outright dismissal.

The next criminal appearance in the case is set for Dec. 11. Forcillo, who is free on $510,000 bail, does not have to appear in person.

The criminal case is proceeding with unusual speed, with a preliminary hearing, which is held to determine if there is enough evidence to go to trial, set for next spring.

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