Skip to main content

Toronto’s Mayor Rob Ford stands on a road construction site in the city’s east end as he discusses plans for road construction work on Tues., April 9, 2013.

chris young The Globe and Mail

Mayor Rob Ford has some advice for motorists when it comes to the busy road work season: "Stay away from it."

The mayor was joined at a Scarborough intersection Tuesday by public works chair Denzil Minnan-Wong and Councillor Gary Crawford to kick off the construction season.

More than $155-million will be spent to improve Toronto's roads and bridges this year, and the city expects to complete 100 kilometres of road resurfacing.

Story continues below advertisement

When asked if he had any advice for motorists when it comes to the road work, Mayor Ford said the best tip is to steer clear.

"There's alternative routes. It might take me maybe five or ten minutes longer to get from Point A to Point B but I'd rather take a long route than be stuck in traffic. So just try to avoid the roads that are being worked on," he told reporters.

The news conference was held on a stretch of Kingston Road that will see reconstruction and resurfacing. Other areas that will see major road work include Albion Road from Steeles Avenue to Highway 27, Bloor Street from Lansdowne Avenue and Bathurst Street, Dufferin Street from Dundas Street to Peel Avenue, and Leslie Street from York Mills Road to Lawrence Avenue and from Steeles Avenue to Finch Avenue.

Councillor Minnan-Wong said the work "will go a long way to keeping our roads and bridges in a state of good repair."

"It'll cost a significant amount of money to do so, but it's absolutely necessary work in order to maintain and improve our transportation infrastructure," he said.

He said the Toronto climate can pose a challenge because, unlike other cities, road work crews can only work so many months a year.

Councillor Minnan-Wong said the city is spending an additional $17-million on structural repairs and safety improvements for the Gardiner Expressway this year.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter
To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies