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Toronto’s transit agency is looking at a range of safety measures, including a small-scale test of dashboard camera technology, in the wake of a girl being killed by a bus.Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

Toronto's transit agency is looking at a range of safety measures, including a small-scale test of dashboard camera technology, in the wake of a girl being killed by a bus.

Amaria Diljohn, 14, was hit last month by a bus, but the driver didn't stop. Charges have not been laid but the incident prompted the Toronto Transit Commission to speed up a safety review. Ideas being considered or piloted range from speed traps to better training to a greater emphasis on driving carefully.

A single forward-facing dashboard camera is being deployed on a bus in a one-year test, TTC head Andy Byford said Wednesday. It's a controversial move, with the union having expressed concerns footage might be used to discipline its members.

In another experiment, drivers on an Etobicoke route are using buses that no longer tell them whether they're on schedule or not. The fear is that this information can prompt them to speed to catch up.

On Wednesday, ATU Local 113 head Bob Kinnear said that a lot of the ideas being considered obscure the fact that drivers are expected to meet schedules devised when Toronto was a less congested city. And he expressed concern that his members would be punished for following the rules and slowing down.

"If they really believe that speed is a concern and they want people to slow down. If they're prepared to say that they're not going to discipline anybody for being five, 10, 15 minutes late, then we will go out and advocate the same message," Mr. Kinnear told reporters after the monthly meeting of the TTC board.

In a separate scrum, Mr. Byford appeared to offer those assurances. "Put safety before the schedule," he said.

Mr. Byford also echoed a presentation from the meeting, saying the TTC is revising schedules to make sure drivers have time to complete routes safely.