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Hamid Aminzada died after being stabbed in the hallway of North Albion Collegiate Institute on Sept. 23, 2014.

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The Toronto District School Board plans on reviewing its school safety measures after the stabbing death of a high school student last month.

Director of Education Donna Quan announced on Monday that a three-member steering committee will review the circumstances leading to the death of 19-year-old Hamid Aminzada, a student at North Albion Collegiate Institute.

"The review will assist us in understanding the circumstances around this tragic incident to ensure that we continue moving the gains we've made in creating safe and caring school environments out to our school communities," Ms. Quan said in a statement.

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The three-member panel is made up of Kim Derry, a former deputy chief of Toronto Police, Sharifa Khan, who has an expertise in community engagement, and Karen Forbes, a former TDSB executive superintendent.

It remains unclear how this panel will differ from the one created after the shooting death of 15-year-old Jordan Manners in 2007 at C.W. Jefferys Collegiate Institute.

That high-profile inquiry, led by Toronto lawyer Julian Falconer, made a slew of recommendations to prevent similar incidents, including increasing the number of support staff and having high-school students wear photo identification around their necks so that intruders could be identified.

Ever since the death of Jordan Manners, TDSB schools have increased security. Security cameras are present outside schools, and police officers spend time in many school communities.

The new panel is expected to release an interim report at the end of November, and a final report by next March.

Mr. Aminzada, only the second student to be slain at a Toronto school, was trying to break up a fight in his school's hallway when he was stabbed. He was declared dead at hospital. A 17-year-old youth has been charged with second-degree murder in connection with the killing.

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