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A police car is parked in Toronto on Aug. 19, 2013.

MARK BLINCH/REUTERS

Constable Tony Vella, a familiar face who has served as a Toronto Police spokesman for years, is eyeing a run at the vacant Ward 3 seat on city council.

In an interview, Constable Vella said he is considering putting his name forward as a candidate for the appointment. The Etobicoke Centre seat was left vacant after Doug Holyday left city politics for Queen's Park this summer.

"This is something I've always wanted to do – get involved with politics," Constable Vella said Wednesday. "It's something I'm passionate about – helping people and helping residents."

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Late last month, council voted to forgo a by-election for the vacant seat, deciding instead to replace Mr. Holyday by appointment. The new councillor will be appointed in October.

Constable Vella said his 18 years of experience with the Toronto Police has reinforced that he loves "dealing with people, dealing with issues, resolving the issues for them."

When asked if he thinks his experience as a spokesperson for Toronto Police – making him a familiar face for Toronto city residents and reporters – will benefit him, he declined to comment.

"I think at the end of the day, you have to judge the person, and the person's passion and heart towards helping people."

Constable Vella, who has lived in Etobicoke for 12 years, said that he would step down from his role with Toronto Police if he does officially put his name forward.

The west-end ward is home to over 52,000 people, and spans the area between Kipling Ave. to the east and Etobicoke Creek to the west, as far north as Eglinton Ave. W. and south to Dundas St. West.

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