Skip to main content

Westbound King St.streetcars lined up in traffic near Spadina Ave. on May 13.

Fred Lum/Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

The Toronto Transit Commission will consider a new service plan this week that would include changes such as all-door boarding on streetcars and buses, but would also come with a multimillion-dollar per year price tag.

The TTC board meets Tuesday and will discuss implementing a series of staff recommendations aimed at improving service across the city's transit network. The list of changes includes creating a time-based fare system that would allow riders to travel any direction on one fare within a two-hour time limit and 10-minute-or-less wait times for certain bus and streetcar lines.

But in order to pay for these changes, the TTC would need and extra $19-million in its 2015 operating budget and an increase each year up to $69-million annually by 2018. The report also indicates that a $288-million boost to the capital budget, spread across five years, would be needed to implement the recommendations.

Story continues below advertisement

The bulk of the increased funding would pay for labour, fuel and maintenance, said Brad Ross, TTC spokesperson.

"To increase service, i.e: to put more buses on the road at the off-peak hours would require more operators. That's where the costs are: it's labour costs, it's fuel costs of course and it's maintenance," Mr. Ross said, adding some of the other proposals — such as the switch to time-based transfers — would result in a loss of revenue, which would need to be offset by budget increases.

"To really improve the service that we provide to a growing ridership and a city that is bursting at the seams with congestion and that really is starting to significantly rely on transit, this will go a long way to help all of that."

The report, titled "Opportunities to Improve Transit Service in Toronto," notes that more impactful change will come from major transit projects such as the Scarborough Subway and Downtown Relief Line, but that these projects are between seven and 20 years away from completion.

"Toronto needs improvements to transit now in order to improve mobility for all residents, reduce worsening traffic congestion and air pollution, provide better access to Toronto's employment, educational and cultural opportunities, and achieve the City's objective of a more-sustainable transportation system," the report reads.

If adopted by the TTC board, the plan will then need to be approved by city council before it could be implemented.

Here is the full list of recommendations in the TTC report:

Story continues below advertisement

a) implement all door boarding and proof-of-payment on all streetcar routes;

b) reduce wait times and crowding on bus and streetcar routes;

c) establish a city-wide network of Ten-Minute-or-Better bus and streetcar services;

d) expand the Express Route Network with new and improved express bus routes;

e) implement more transit priority measures;

f) add resources to improve service reliability and route performance;

Story continues below advertisement

g) operate all routes all day, every day across the city;

h) change the one-trip-per-fare to a two-hour-travel-privilege-per-fare; and

i) expand the overnight bus and streetcar network.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter
To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies