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Striking members of CUPE 3902, including University of Toronto teaching assistants, lab assistants, and graduate student instructors, block traffic while picketing on the U of T campus on Monday, March 2, 2015.

Darren Calabrese/The Globe and Mail

University of Toronto education workers have voted to end their nearly month-long strike through binding arbitration and return to work.

Their union says members voted 942 to 318 at a meeting on Thursday to take their dispute to binding arbitration.

University president Meric Gertler called Wednesday for binding arbitration in an effort to preserve the academic year for students by ending the strike that began Feb. 27.

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Gertler said both sides had worked hard to find a deal through collective bargaining but remained at an impasse.

Earlier this week, the striking education workers voted narrowly to reject a tentative agreement that was reached last week.

Local 3902 of the Canadian Union of Public Employees said that while the proposed agreement included increases in minimum funding, it failed to address underlying wage and job security issues.

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