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A Union flag flies near Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament in London October 24, 2011.

REUTERS/TOBY MELVILLE/REUTERS/TOBY MELVILLE

Britain is considering whether to put the clocks forward by an hour all year round for a three-year trial period, but the proposal is likely to be blocked by opponents in Scotland.

The plan would see clocks in winter moved to Central European Time (GMT plus one hour) and to Central European Summer Time (GMT plus two hours) in summer.

The UK reverts back to GMT this weekend, an annual ritual often described as one of the most depressing times of the year as clocks go back an hour and darkness falls earlier ahead of the cold winter months.

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Supporters say the proposal would help cut road accidents, save money on energy bills, reduce carbon emissions and that the extra evening daylight would help cut crime.

Opponents, mainly in Scotland, argue it would lead to more accidents in darker mornings where some areas would not become light until mid-morning. They say a similar trial in 1968-71 failed to show any benefits.

The government said on Friday it would consider backing the plan, put forward in a bill by a backbench Member of Parliament, but only if it had support from the devolved administrations in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

"This is an issue which affects everyone across the country so we cannot rush head first into this," Business Minister Ed Davey said in a statement.

"It is only right that we at least look at what the potential economic and social benefits of any change might be."

However Scotland indicated it would maintain its opposition to any move.

"The Scottish government's established position is that there is no case for a change to existing arrangements," a spokesman said.

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