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Gill Rosenberg walks through the Knesset, Israel's parliament, in Jerusalem July 13, 2015.

Ronen Zvulun/Reuters

A Canadian-born woman who served in the Israeli military and later joined a Kurdish militia fighting the Islamic State group has returned to Israel.

Gill Rosenberg told Israel's Army Radio on Monday that after eight months of fighting in Syria it was time to come home.

She said her Jewish values compelled her to "do the right thing not just by our own people, but by any human being."

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Rosenberg served in the Israeli military and was previously a pilot in Canada.

She spent time in a U.S prison for her part in a phone scam before joining the Kurdish militia last year.

She was among the first female volunteers to fight in the Syrian civil war. Later, there were false reports that she had been captured by Islamic State group.

Rosenberg is from White Rock, B.C., and went to high school in Vancouver.

She had pleaded guilty for her role in an elaborate Israeli-based boiler room telephone fraud that fleeced unwitting elderly Americans out of millions.

U.S. court documents have detailed her as someone who once struggled with alcohol and drug abuse but got treatment in prison.

She was spared jail and sentenced to time served after she had spent nearly four and a half years in custody.

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The judge who presided over her case said Rosenberg had made a lot of progress in five years, including becoming "clean and sober."

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