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At least three deaths were blamed on a late February snowstorm that hit Kansas, Missouri and Illinois Feb. 26. It was expected to hit Southern Ontario later that evening.

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A man pushes a snowblower around a giant pile of snow left by road crews in the Country Club Plaza shopping district of Kansas City, Mo., Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013. For the second time in a week, a major winter storm paralyzed parts of the nation's midsection Tuesday, dumping a fresh layer of heavy, wet snow atop cities still choked with piles from the previous system and making travel perilous from the Oklahoma panhandle to the Great Lakes. The weight of the snow strained power lines and cut electricity to more than 100,000 homes and businesses. At least three deaths were blamed on the blizzard.

Orlin Wagner/AP

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Tedd Hendrix, of Sedalia, Mo., frees a line of cable from downed branches Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013, as he works to tie the line off so that it is elevated and out of the road. A snow storm, the second in less than a week, dumped about a foot of snow in Sedalia, knocking out power around the town and collapsing the roofs of several buildings.

Sydney Brink/AP

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A bison lays in the snow at the David Traylor Zoo in Emporia, Kan. after a snow storm hit in the early hours of Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013. The second major snowstorm in a week battered the nation's midsection Tuesday, dropping a half-foot or more of snow across Missouri and Kansas and cutting power to thousands. Gusting winds blew drifts more than 2 feet high and created treacherous driving conditions for those who dared the morning commute.

Matthew Fowler/AP

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Westar Energy crews work on snow covered power lines in Lawrence, Kan., Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013. The second major snowstorm in a week battered the nation's midsection Tuesday, dropping a half-foot or more of snow across Missouri and Kansas and cutting power to thousands. Gusting winds blew drifts more than 2 feet high and created treacherous driving conditions for those who dared the morning commute.

Orlin Wagner/AP

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Fresh snow covers Anish Kapoor's sculpture "Cloud Gate" and gives it the appearance of a cracked egg as a lone pedestrian walks around the stainless steel attraction in Chicago's Millennium Park, as a winter storm of rain and snow begins Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013. Forecasters expect the storm to leave behind three to six inches of snow in the greater Chicago area.

Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

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Footprints coming from and leading back to Anish Kapoor's sculpture "Cloud Gate" in Chicago's Millennium Park, remain as a winter storm of rain and snow begins Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013. Forecasters expect the storm to leave behind three to six inches of snow in the greater Chicago area.

Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

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Snow covers docks at Lakeview, a private lake and club, near Lawrence, Kan., Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013. For the second time in a week, a major winter storm paralyzed parts of the nation's midsection Tuesday, dumping a fresh layer of heavy, wet snow atop cities still choked with piles from the previous system and making travel perilous from the Oklahoma panhandle to the Great Lakes. The weight of the snow strained power lines and cut electricity to more than 100,000 homes and businesses. At least three deaths were blamed on the blizzard.

Orlin Wagner/AP

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Wes Anderson clears the driveway in front of his grandparents' house, Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013 in Sedalia, Mo. The second major snowstorm in a week battered the nation's midsection Tuesday, dropping a half-foot or more of snow across Missouri and Kansas with gusting winds blew drifts more than 2 feet high creating treacherous driving conditions for those who dared the morning commute.

Sydney Brink/AP

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