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Every morning looters, scavengers or stressed citizens trying to survive will meet to get pieces of wood, metal, food, or any other leftover of the tragedy.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

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Every morning looters, scavengers or stressed citizens trying to survive, meet to get pieces of wood, metal, food, or any other leftover of the tragedy.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

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A woman stands amidst the rubble of the destroyed commercial district of downtown Port-au-Prince.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

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A priest talks to his congregation through a megaphone during mass outside of the Port-au-Prince cathedral that was destroyed by the magnitude 7.0 earthquake more than two weeks ago.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

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A man's shoe is seen in the debris of Port-au-Prince's commercial district.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

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People walk into the gardens of Port-au-Prince cathedral where the traditional Sunday mass will be held outside after the Cathedral was destroyed by the earthquake.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

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A picture of Mother Mary Lange, an Haitian woman foundress of the Oblate Sisters of Providence and St. Frances Academy in Maryland, can be seen amidst the debris of the destroyed Port-au-Prince cathedral.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

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