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Philippine authorities have sought to regulate betting but illegal games persist, with men and women, rich and poor, betting on anything from cockfighting to the Basque hard-rubber ball game of jai-alai, basketball to spider races.

Residents play cards near a coffin during a funeral wake in Manila. Betting is particularly common at wakes because the family of the deceased gets a share of the winnings to help cover funeral expenses.

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Children watch a round of spider betting in Manila. Spider betting, both legal and illegal, is one of the more popular forms of sports betting among schoolchildren in the Philippines, attracting rich and poor alike.

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Kristo, a bet caller, shouts at gamblers at a cockfighting arena north of Manila. Cockfighting has a long history in the Philippines, dating back years prior to the country's Spanish colonisation in 1521.

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Youths play a form of pool on a carom board in Las Pinas city, Metro Manila. Pool and billiards, both legal and illegal, provide some of the more popular forms of sports betting in the Philippines.

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A casino financier, wearing rings and with painted fingernails, counts money she collected from a gambler only moments before, in Angeles city, north of Manila.

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Women play bingo inside a house in Quezon City, Metro Manila. Bingo, both legal and illegal, is one of the more popular forms of sports betting in the Philippines, attracting rich and poor alike.

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Gamblers play a Spanish card game known locally as "sakla" in an underground casino in Malabon, Metro Manila.

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Roosters fight during an illegal cockfighting match known locally as "tupada" in Metro Manila. Cockfighting remains a hugely popular form of gambling.

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The Philippines has emerged as one of Asia's hottest gambling hubs after it launched its 120-hectare (1.2 square km) gaming and leisure enclave called Entertainment City in the capital, modelled on the Las Vegas strip.

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A card dealer in Manila shuffles a deck next to his son during a local version of poker known as "pusoy."

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