Skip to main content

World Flamboyant U.S. congressman James Traficant served time for bribery

James Traficant, seen with his wife in 2009, was only the second person to be expelled from Congress since the Civil War.

Scott Shaw/Associated Press

James Traficant, the colourful U.S. politician whose conviction for taking bribes and kickbacks made him only the second person to be expelled from the U.S. Congress since the Civil War, died on Saturday. He was 73.

Mr. Traficant was seriously injured last Tuesday after a vintage tractor flipped over on him as he tried to park it inside a barn on the family farm in Ohio. He died four days later in the hospital, said Dave Betras, chairman of the Mahoning County Democratic Party.

The Democrat's expulsion from Congress in 2002 came three months after a federal jury convicted him. Prosecutors said he used his office to extract bribes from businesspeople and coerced staffers to work on his farm and his houseboat on the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. He also was charged with witness tampering, destroying evidence and filing false tax returns. He spent seven years in prison.

Story continues below advertisement

Mr. Traficant's notoriety was rivalled only by his eccentricity. He loved to play the buffoon during his 17 years in Congress. He got plenty of notice within the staid, buttoned-down Capitol and airtime on TV for his messy mop of hair – revealed to be a wig when he went to prison – his typical wardrobe of cowboy boots, denim or polyester suits, and his bombastic speaking style.

His made-for-TV rants on the floor of the House of Representatives invariably ended with the sign off "Beam me up, Scotty," which he borrowed from Star Trek to show his disgust or bemusement at whatever he found particularly outrageous.

"Mr. Traficant was a complex man," Mr. Betras said. "He gave voice to the frustrations and anxieties of the common man. The public felt he was one of them and because of that connection, they supported him in good times and in bad. He was a larger-than-life character who will long be remembered."

Mr. Traficant was born May 8, 1941, in Youngstown, Ohio, and worked as a drug counsellor for 10 years before running for Mahoning County sheriff at a colleague's suggestion. He endeared himself to voters in the early 1980s by defying the courts and going to jail for three nights rather than foreclose on the homes of workers laid off from the city's dying steel industry.

The antagonism between him and federal law enforcement authorities lasted throughout his public career, with Mr. Traficant trumpeting it as proof that he was on the side of "the little guy" against powerful government interests.

He faced his first federal bribery and corruption trial in 1983, when he was Mahoning County sheriff. Prosecutors accused him of taking bribes to protect mobsters' criminal activity. He defended himself in court, although he was not a lawyer, and won. He argued that he was conducting a one-person sting.

He was elected to Congress the following year and was easily re-elected eight times. In 2000, as he geared up for re-election, Mr. Traficant was indicted in a grand jury investigation that targeted corruption and organized crime in the Youngstown area.

Story continues below advertisement

He claimed the government had tried to frame him because of his criticism of the FBI, CIA and IRS. During the two-month trial, he did a curbside interview on live network TV outside the courthouse each morning and then went inside to challenge U.S. District Judge Lesley Brooks Wells, who tried to dissuade Mr. Traficant from representing himself.

He was expelled from Congress in a 420-1 vote by the House on July 24, 2002, three months after being convicted on 10 corruption-related counts. He was the second person to be expelled from Congress since the Civil War – the first was Representative Michael (Ozzie) Myers of Pennsylvania over the Abscam scandal).

His case over, he ran for re-election from prison as an independent in 2002 and lost to former aide Tim Ryan, although he drew 15 per cent of the vote. He was released from prison in September, 2009, and the following year ran for the Youngstown-area congressional seat as an independent. He received 16 per cent of the vote, again losing to Mr. Ryan, and then faded from the spotlight.

He leaves his wife, Patricia, and two daughters, Robin and Elizabeth.

To submit an I Remember: obit@globeandmail.com

Send us a memory of someone we have recently profiled on the Obituaries page. Please include I Remember in the subject field.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter