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TORONTO, ONT. - JUNE 8, 2010 - G20 SECURITY - Preparations on the security fence continue as the date of the G20 approaches. This worker is securing the mesh fence to the upright poles along Lower Simcoe Street, which is shut down to traffic while the work is being done. Their was a very small, and peaceful "information" session held at the south end of the Toronto Convention Centre by a number of activists who are planning to participate in the Day of Action on June 25th. (Peter Power/Peter Power/THE GLOBE AND MAIL)
TORONTO, ONT. - JUNE 8, 2010 - G20 SECURITY - Preparations on the security fence continue as the date of the G20 approaches. This worker is securing the mesh fence to the upright poles along Lower Simcoe Street, which is shut down to traffic while the work is being done. Their was a very small, and peaceful "information" session held at the south end of the Toronto Convention Centre by a number of activists who are planning to participate in the Day of Action on June 25th. (Peter Power/Peter Power/THE GLOBE AND MAIL)

Road closures

Toronto traffic chaos looms during G20 summit Add to ...

The G20 summit will mean huge traffic headaches for Torontonians.

Police on Friday outlined road closures and restrictions in the Greater Toronto Area from June 24 through June 27.

Ontario Provincial Police Sergeant Dave Woodford said the city's four major highways - Highway 401, Highway 427, the Gardiner Expressway and the Don Valley Parkway - will have lane restrictions and "periodic full closures" that will cause "significant delays".

The bulk of the shutdowns will affect Highway 427 and the Gardiner Expressway, the main routes between Pearson International Airport and downtown Toronto.

From June 24 to June 26, the closures will largely affect traffic heading to the downtown core. On June 27, the last day of the summit, the restrictions will impact outbound motorists as world leaders depart the city.

Police said drivers heading to the airport "can expect major delays" and motorists should give themselves extra time.

During the summit period, police will sometimes re-route traffic away from the city. For example, Sgt. Woodford said southbound traffic on Highway 427 may be required to exit to the westbound lanes of the Queen Elizabeth Way.

Police urged area residents to use public transit and plan alternate routes. For instance, Toronto Police traffic Sergeant Tim Burrows said drivers who usually travel east-west on King Street may want to consider using Bloor Street or even St. Clair Avenue.

"What we'd ask everybody is lots of patience. Give yourself lots of extra time. Learn alternate routes now, before you need to know them that day. Go extra and far beyond what you would normally think is the best route," Sgt. Burrows said. "The farther away you go, the less ripple effect you're going to find with the traffic."

Click here for more details on traffic disruption.

A downtown traffic diversion zone will extend from Spadina Avenue in the west to Yonge Street, and from King Street West south to Lake Shore Boulevard West. Toronto police will be in the area to ensure cars do not stop, idle or park. Vehicles violating the rules will be tagged or towed.

With a report from Sasha Nagy

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