Skip to main content

In Ghana, the burial containers are so creative that they've become an export item. Photos by Iain Marlow

1 of 8

An eagle coffin by artist Eric Adjetey Anang at the Kane Kwei Carpentry Works shop in Teshie, Ghana.

Iain Marlow/The Globe and Mail

2 of 8

A coffin maker paints the top of a boat coffin at the back of the Kane Kwei Carpentry Works coffin workshop in Teshie, Ghana.

Iain Marlow/The Globe and Mail

3 of 8

A Tuborg beer bottle coffin by artist Eric Adjetey Anang, as well as a packed lunch coffin and a cow coffin, await shipment to a festival in Denmark at a coffin workshop in Teshie, Ghana.

Iain Marlow/The Globe and Mail

4 of 8

Boris Bokorvi, an apprentice, shows on his phone what the final coffin should look like. The final coffin will eventually have no leaves, and be made to look like it has been felled, with an attached stump.

Iain Marlow/The Globe and Mail

Story continues below advertisement

6 of 8

Eric Anang, a third generation coffin maker, inside his Kane Kwei Carpentry Works in Teshie, Ghana.

Iain Marlow/The Globe and Mail

7 of 8

Eric Anang's father relaxes outside of Kane Kwei Carpentry Works in Teshie, Ghana, while ‘design’ coffins by artist Eric Adjetey Anang in the shape of various animals peer out of the shop.

Iain Marlow/The Globe and Mail

8 of 8

Pallbearers, having placed Ataa Adjei Laryea's body inside a fallen tree coffin by artist Eric Adjetey Anang, begin the funeral procession out of the laneways and to the burial ground. They will pass other funerals on the way.

Iain Marlow/The Globe and Mail

Report an error Editorial code of conduct