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Simangele Mmema, principal of Kholwane primary school in rural Swaziland, had to close her school early for the year after it ran out of food and water, a result of the country’s financial crisis.

Erin Conway-Smith/erin conway-smith The Globe and Mail

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Grade 1 students at Kholwane primary school in rural Swaziland sit in groups of seven at desks intended to seat two. The school has a shortage of desks, and broken chairs, but no budget for new ones. The school was forced to close early for the year because it had run out of food and water, a result of the country’s financial crisis.

Erin Conway-Smith/erin conway-smith The Globe and Mail

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Simangele Mmema, principal of Kholwane primary school in rural Swaziland, had to close her school early for the year because it had run out of food and water, a result of the country’s financial crisis. She stands here in front of the school; next to it are water tanks. The government stopped delivering water because its trucks had no fuel, and so now the school collects rainwater for the students to drink.

Erin Conway-Smith/erin conway-smith The Globe and Mail

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Students at Kholwane primary school in rural Swaziland. This school closed early for the year because it had run out of food and water, a result of the country’s financial crisis, and some of the students were collapsing from hunger at morning assemblies.

Erin Conway-Smith/erin conway-smith The Globe and Mail

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Teachers mark papers outside Kholwane primary school in rural Swaziland. There are no offices for the teachers or principal, and no money to build them.

Erin Conway-Smith/erin conway-smith The Globe and Mail

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Abraham Nkambule, 70, a farmer, pictured here with his wife, was delayed from planting his subsistence crops because he was not regularly receiving monthly grants, which the state is to provide to pensioners. As a result, he sometimes goes to bed with an empty stomach.

Erin Conway-Smith/erin conway-smith The Globe and Mail

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Solomon Nkambule, 70, (left) and cousin Abraham Nkambule, also 70, have not been regularly receiving their monthly grants, which the state is to provide to pensioners. But they donít want to complain, and are thankful for what the king gives them.

Erin Conway-Smith/erin conway-smith The Globe and Mail

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Solomon Nkambule, 70, has not been regularly receiving his monthly grants, which the state is to provide to pensioners. But he won’t complain, and says he is thankful for what the king gives him.

Erin Conway-Smith/erin conway-smith The Globe and Mail

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Swaziland’s King Mswati III is building a new conference centre for visiting dignitaries, located next to one of his palaces. Construction continues despite his country being in a financial crisis.

Erin Conway-Smith/erin conway-smith The Globe and Mail

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