Skip to main content

The Globe and Mail

In pictures: Angry relatives demand answers after Malaysia confirms jet crashed

In Beijing and Kuala Lumpur, families and authorities come to terms with the grim news that Flight 370 went down somewhere in the Indian Ocean

1 of 12

Family members of passengers onboard Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 attend a routine briefing given by Malaysian representatives at Lido Hotel in Beijing March 24, 2014.

JASON LEE/REUTERS

2 of 12

A woman read message cards tied up for passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines plane, at a shopping mall in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Monday, March 24, 2014. A Chinese plane on Monday spotted two white, square-shaped objects in an area identified by satellite imagery as containing possible debris from the missing Malaysian airliner, while the United States separately prepared to send a specialized device that can locate black boxes.

AP

3 of 12

A ground controller guides a Royal Australian Air Force AP-3C Orion to rest after sunset upon its return from a search for Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 over the Indian Ocean, at RAAF Base Pearce north of Perth, March 24, 2014. An Australian navy ship was close to finding possible debris from a missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner on Monday as a mounting number of sightings of floating objects raised hopes wreckage of the plane may soon be found. The HMAS Success should reach two objects spotted by Australian military aircraft by Tuesday morning at the latest, Malaysia's government said, offering the first chance of picking up suspected debris from the plane.

JASON REED/Reuters

4 of 12

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak speaks during a press conference for the missing Malaysia Airlines, flight MH370, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Monday, March 24, 2014. A new analysis of satellite data indicates the missing Malaysia Airlines plane crashed into a remote corner of the Indian Ocean, Najib said Monday.

Joshua Paul/AP

Story continues below advertisement

5 of 12

Medical personnel and people use a stretcher to carry out a woman who fainted after the announcement by the Malaysian government that the missing Malaysia Airlines airliner MH370 had crashed in the Indian Ocean, from a hotel ballroom in Beijing, China Monday, March 24, 2014. It was the grim news that families of the missing Malaysian Airlines flight had dreaded for weeks, and on Monday they heard it from Malaysia’s prime minister: new analysis of satellite data indicates the missing plane crashed into a remote corner of the Indian Ocean.

AP

6 of 12

A family member of a passenger aboard Malaysia Airlines MH370 falls down an escalator as he cries after watching a television broadcast of a news conference, at Lido hotel in Beijing, March 24, 2014. Relatives of Chinese passengers aboard the missing Malaysia Airlines flight reacted with hysteria on Monday after the Malaysian prime minister announced the jet ended its journey in the remote Southern Indian Ocean.

JASON LEE/REUTERS

7 of 12

A relative of passengers aboard Malaysia Airlines MH370 cries at the Lido hotel in Beijing, March 24, 2014, after hearing an announcement on the missing flight by Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak. Relatives of Chinese passengers on the missing flight screamed, cried and collapsed on the ground on Monday after Najib announced the jet ended its journey in the remote Southern Indian Ocean.

KIM KYUNG-HOON/REUTERS

8 of 12

Relatives of Chinese passengers aboard Malaysia Airlines MH370 listen as a representative (not pictured) reads their complaints about the Malaysian government at the Lido hotel in Beijing, March 25, 2014, after an announcement by Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak on the missing flight. The relatives screamed, cried and collapsed on the ground on Monday after Najib announced the jet ended its journey in the remote Southern Indian Ocean.

KIM KYUNG-HOON/REUTERS

9 of 12

Co-Pilot Flying Officer Marc Smith and a crewman calculate fuel consumption aboard a Royal Australian Air Force AP-3C Orion aircraft search for the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 over the southern Indian Ocean March 24, 2014.

Richard Wainwright/REUTERS

10 of 12

A crewman prepares a sonar buoy aboard a Royal Australian Air Force AP-3C Orion aircraft search for the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 over the southern Indian Ocean March 24, 2014. An Australian aircraft scouring the southern Indian Ocean for signs of a Malaysia Airlines jet missing for more than two weeks has spotted two new objects, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said on Monday. Abbott told parliament an Australian naval vessel was near where the objects, one circular and greenish grey in colour and the second orange and rectangular, had been seen and hoped to be able to recover them soon.

Richard Wainwright/REUTERS

11 of 12

Co-Pilot Flying Officer Marc Smith and crewmen fly at high altitude aboard a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) AP-3C Orion aircraft after searching for the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 over the southern Indian Ocean March 24, 2014. An Australian aircraft scouring the southern Indian Ocean for signs of a Malaysia Airlines jet missing for more than two weeks has spotted two new objects, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said on Monday. Abbott told parliament an Australian naval vessel was near where the objects, one circular and greenish grey in colour and the second orange and rectangular, had been seen and hoped to be able to recover them soon. Picture taken March 24, 2014.

Richard Wainwright/REUTERS

12 of 12

A family member of a passenger aboard Malaysia Airlines MH370 shouts at journalists after watching a television broadcast of a news conference, at the Lido hotel in Beijing, March 24, 2014. Relatives of Chinese passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines flight reacted with hysteria on Monday after the Malaysian prime minister announced the jet ended its journey in the remote Southern Indian Ocean.

JASON LEE/REUTERS

Report an error