Skip to main content

The Globe and Mail

In pictures: As opposition demonstrators call for Maduro's ouster, Venezuelans march for peace

On Sunday, scuffles broke out as government security forces tried to detain a retired army general who had encouraged anti-government gangs to set up roadblocks in Caracas.

1 of 9

Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro, right, and his wife First Lady Celia Flores wave to supporters during a rally with elderly people in Caracas, Venezuela, Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014. Maduro has been working to control an increasingly violent opposition movement after two weeks of anti-government protests against crime and inflation.

Rodrigo Abd/AP

2 of 9

A man wearing a T-shirt of Venezuela's independence hero Simon Bolivar chants pro-government slogans during a march by elderly people in Caracas, Venezuela, Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014. The march was organized by the government in the name of peace, and ended at Miraflores presidential palace where the seniors met with Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro.

Rodrigo Abd/AP

3 of 9

Bolivarian National Guard officers, middle, flanked by presidential honor guards, stand outside Miraflores presidential palace as a pro-government march of elderly people arrives in Caracas, Venezuela, Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014.

Rodrigo Abd/AP

4 of 9

Elderly women dance at a pro-government rally and march in Caracas, Venezuela, Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014.

Rodrigo Abd/AP

Story continues below advertisement

5 of 9

People carry a giant Venezuelan flag during a protest by Venezuelan citizens residing in Mexico, against the government of Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro and the violence resulting from anti-government protests, at the Angel of Independence in Mexico City February 23, 2014. A meeting between a top Venezuelan opposition leader and state governor Henrique Capriles and President Nicolas Maduro on Monday may help ease nearly two weeks of violent anti-government protests that have killed at least eight people. Maduro, who has vowed to nurture the self-styled socialist revolution he inherited from late president Hugo Chavez, calls the demonstrations acts of terrorism by "fascists" seeking a coup similar to the one that briefly ousted Chavez in 2002.

HENRY ROMERO/REUTERS

6 of 9

A girl with her face painted in the colors of the Venezuelan flag participates in a protest of Venezuelan citizens residing in Mexico, against the government of Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro and the violence resulting from anti-government protests, in Mexico City February 23, 2014.

HENRY ROMERO/REUTERS

7 of 9

An elderly woman yells slogans during a march for peace in downtown Caracas February 23, 2014. Hundreds of elderly Venezuelans marched through Caracas on Sunday in a show of support for the government of President Nicolas Maduro.

TOMAS BRAVO/REUTERS

8 of 9

Children walk past a graffiti of U.S. President Barack Obama carrying a bomb, and reading 'The empire's peace' in downtown Caracas February 23, 2014.

TOMAS BRAVO/REUTERS

9 of 9

Angel Vivas, a retired army general and anti-Maduro protester, stands in his house with an automatic weapon as he resists detention in Caracas, February 23, 2014. According to local media, President Nicolas Maduro ordered the detention of Vivas on Saturday.

STRINGER/REUTERS

Report an error