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Kogelo, a hamlet in western Kenya, waits for the results of the U.S. presidential election to see whether Barack Obama - whose father came from here - will be reelected

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Paul Opiyo Ojwang, 43, repairs a bicycle at his open-air garage in Kogelo. The hamlet in western Kenya is the ancestral home of U.S. President Barack Obama. Four years ago, Kogelo, and Africa in general, celebrated with noisy gusto when Obama, whose father came from here, became the first African-American to be elected president of the United States.

THOMAS MUKOYA/REUTERS

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Looking across the Atlantic to the Nov. 6 presidential election, people here are cooler now towards the “son of Africa” who is seeking a second term. There are questions too whether his Republican rival, Mitt Romney, will have more to offer to sub-Saharan Africa if he wins the White House.

THOMAS MUKOYA/REUTERS

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A student from Barack Obama Primary School walks from school in Kogelo.

THOMAS MUKOYA/REUTERS

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A student from Barack Obama Primary School carries his classmate as they walk from school in Kogelo, the ancestral home of U.S. President Barack Obama.

THOMAS MUKOYA/REUTERS

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Kenyan witch-doctor John Dimo, who claims to be 105 years old, throws shells, bones, and other magic items to predict the outcome of the U.S. election in the village of Kogelo. Dimo claims to have known Obama's late father - and Dimo, who inherited his position from his father in 1962, is confident of his traditional methods.

Ben Curtis/AP

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Mr. Dimo interprets the result: Mr. Obama will win.

Ben Curtis/AP

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