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Barriers went down at federal memorials, National Park Service sites, as well as the Smithsonian Institution's network of popular museums and thousands of furloughed federal workers returned to work across the country Thursday after 16 days off the job due to the partial government shutdown.

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Richard Doerner, Museum Specialist for the U.S. Senate Commission on Art, winds the Ohio Clock outside the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 in Washington. The clock stopped during the 16 day government shutdown because the workers that care for the clock were furloughed.

Evan Vucci/AP

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Red-jacketed tour leaders, furloughed during the 16-day U.S. government shutdown, lead tours in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda in Washington, October 17, 2013. The U.S. Congress on Wednesday approved an 11th-hour deal to end a partial government shutdown and pull the world's biggest economy back from the brink of a historic debt default that could have threatened financial calamity.

JONATHAN ERNST/REUTERS

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Dr. Bertholt Meyer (R) and James Pope assist the robot "The Incredible Bionic Man" while it walks at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington October 17, 2013. The robot is the world's first-ever functioning bionic man made of prosthetic parts and artificial organ implants.

JOSHUA ROBERTS/REUTERS

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Visitors walk through the Korean War Veterans Memorial after it was reopened to the public in Washington October 17, 2013. The White House moved quickly early on Thursday to get the U.S. government back up and running after a 16-day shutdown, directing hundreds of thousands of workers to return to work.

KEVIN LAMARQUE/REUTERS

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Visitors are led on an official tour, which had been suspended during the 16-day government shutdown, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, October 17, 2013. The U.S. Congress on Wednesday approved an 11th-hour deal to end a partial government shutdown and pull the world's biggest economy back from the brink of a historic debt default that could have threatened financial calamity.

JONATHAN ERNST/REUTERS

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Kaity Briscoe laughs with U.S. Park Service Ranger V. Cutright as she and husband Jordan Rousseau, center, wait for the USS Constitution, the oldest ship in the United States Navy, to open in Boston, Thursday morning, Oct. 17, 2013. Federal memorials and National Park Service sites opened, and thousands of furloughed federal workers returned to work across the country Thursday after 16 days off the job due to the partial government shutdown.

Stephan Savoia/AP

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Students take photos during a visit to the Lincoln Memorial after it was reopened to the pubic in Washington October 17, 2013. The White House moved quickly early on Thursday to get the U.S. government back up and running after a 16-day shutdown, directing hundreds of thousands of workers to return to work.

KEVIN LAMARQUE/REUTERS

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An employee arrives at the Federal Building in Los Angeles October 17, 2013. The White House moved quickly early on Thursday to get the U.S. government back up and running after a 16-day shutdown, directing hundreds of thousands of workers to return to work.

JONATHAN ALCORN/REUTERS

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Visitors to the U.S.S. Constitution, the oldest ship in the United States Navy, walk up the gang plank to the top deck for a tour in Boston, Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013. Federal memorials and National Park Service sites opened, and thousands of furloughed federal workers returned to work across the country Thursday after 16 days off the job due to the partial government shutdown.

Stephan Savoia/AP

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With the Washington Monument in the distance, Park Service police officers stand on duty at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013. Barriers went down at National Park Service sites and thousands of furloughed federal workers began returning to work throughout the country Thursday after 16 days off the job because of the partial government shutdown.

Susan Walsh/AP

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