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A young man who game his name only as Raheem video chats with a friend near the place where Freddie Gray was arrested in the Sandtown neighborhood April 21, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland.

Chip Somodevilla

The lawyer for the family of a black man who died of spinal injuries he sustained during an arrest in Baltimore said he believes the police had no reason to stop the man in the first place.

Freddie Gray, 25, was arrested on April 12 after police "made eye contact" with him and another man and the two started running, authorities said. Gray was placed in a transport van, and roughly 30 minutes later was rushed to the hospital in critical condition.

Gray died Sunday of what Deputy Police Commissioner Jerry Rodriguez described as "a significant spinal injury" at a Monday news conference. A vigil was planned Tuesday evening at the spot where he was arrested.

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Gray's death, which comes amid a national debate about the deaths of black men at the hands of police, has prompted angry protests and comes six months after Baltimore officials released a plan to reduce police brutality and misconduct. The U.S. Justice Department said Tuesday it planned to review police policies and procedures.

The Justice Department's review should include a broad investigation of whether officers have committed civil rights violations, said the Rev. Cortly C.D. Witherspoon, president of the Baltimore chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference civil rights group. He said he plans to send a letter with that request by Wednesday.

What led to Gray's injury — and why Gray was initially pursued by police — is still unknown.

According to court documents, Officer Garrett Miller sought to charge Gray with carrying a switchblade, which was discovered in Gray's pocket after he was stopped. But at a news conference Monday, Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said "we know having a knife is not necessarily a crime."

Police Commissioner Anthony Batts also said the reason for Gray's stop is "a question we have to dig into."

Billy Murphy, the lawyer hired by Gray's family, said he believes the officers had no probable cause to stop Gray.

"They've made concessions on lack of probable cause," Murphy said of officials. "Running while black is not probable cause."

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Officials on Monday vowed transparency and pledged to hold those found responsible accountable. Batts said the investigation will be completed by May 1 and the results will be sent to the state attorney's office to determine whether criminal charges will be filed. Batts also said he is ordering that police review and rewrite "effective immediately" its policies on moving prisoners and providing them with medical attention.

"I understand the community's frustration. I understand it because I'm frustrated," Rawlings-Blake said. "I'm angry that we are here again, that we have had to tell another mother that their child is dead."

Police on Monday also released a more detailed timeline of how Gray was arrested and transported.

It revealed for the first time that Gray was placed in leg irons after an officer felt he was becoming "irate" in the back of the transport van, and that the van made several stops on its way to the police station, even stopping to pick up another prisoner in an unrelated case, after Gray had asked for medical attention several times. Upon arrest, police said Gray asked for an inhaler and requested care several times before he was ultimately taken to the hospital.

But Murphy said he's still left with more questions than answers.

"They were vague about how his spine was injured," Murphy said. "Who did it? How did they do it and why did they do it?"

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