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Muslims will celebrate Eid al-Fitr on July 17, 2015, after a month of fasting during the holy month of Ramadan. On this dayMuslims in countries around the world start the day with prayer and spend time with family, offer gifts and often give to charity.

A picture taken from the Abraj al-Bait Towers, also known as the Mecca Royal Hotel Clock Tower, shows Muslim worshipers praying at the Grand Mosque in the Muslim holy city of Mecca, a day before the end of the fasting month of Ramadan.

AFP/Getty Images

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An Indonesian Muslim man breathes fire during a game of fire football, known as 'bola api' ahead of Eid Al-Fitr celebrations in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images

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Bangladeshi passengers sit on the roof of a train, as they head to their homes to celebrate Eid al-Fitr in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

A.M. Ahad/AP

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Pakistani beauticians apply henna designs to customers ahead of the Eid al-Fitr holiday which marks the end of Ramadan at a beauty salon in Karachi.

Asif Hassan/AFP/Getty Images

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Pakistan travellers ride a bus as they try to get home to their respective villages to be with their families ahead of the Muslim festival of Eid al-Fitr marking the end of Ramadan in Lahore.

Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images

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An Indian stret vendor cuts fruit to sell to Muslim devotees to use to break the Ramadan fast at Iftar in Kolkata.

Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images

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A picture taken from the Abraj al-Bait Towers, also known as the Mecca Royal Hotel Clock Tower, shows Muslim worshipers praying at the Grand Mosque in the Muslim holy city of Mecca, a day before the end of the fasting month of Ramadan.

AFP/Getty Images

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An Indonesian Muslim man plays fire stick during parade ahead of Eid Al-Fitr celebrations in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images

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A firework explodes near a noisy motorcade during a festive street gathering in Jakarta on the eve of Eid al-Fitr marking the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan.

Romeo Gacad/AFP/Getty Images

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A Pakistani vendor makes traditional sweet 'jalabi', for customers to celebrate the upcoming Eid al-Fitr holiday to mark the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan, in Peshawar, Pakistan.

Mohammad Sajjad/AP

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